February 22, 2017, 1:43 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07293 UAE Dirham
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.03515 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30481 Argentine Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Euro
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1 Philippine Peso = 4.05262 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15408 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46652 Honduras Lempira
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1 Philippine Peso = 265.01191 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07353 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.32923 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.45115 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 643.20888 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18924 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.54845 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01407 Jordanian Dinar
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1 Philippine Peso = 2.05322 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.37172 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.01906 Cambodia Riel
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1 Philippine Peso = 17.87133 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.76807 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00605 Kuwaiti Dinar
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1 Philippine Peso = 6.33439 Kazakhstan Tenge
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.25715 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06054 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01232 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02826 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19979 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39525 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.14496 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.88642 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 49.14615 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15873 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.05322 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.70234 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30421 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.29706 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.40758 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08849 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26128 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.25496 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58627 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16555 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.15647 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02763 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00764 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01986 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06476 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06296 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08122 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08074 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 114.24742 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07229 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08451 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.15249 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.1811 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07447 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15448 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26803 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13238 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17685 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02815 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01598 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44095 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 145.88959 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.90151 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 458.00835 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1732 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.22597 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26146 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.69519 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04538 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0447 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07189 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13343 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6112 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.24146 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53981 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.20731 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01986 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56195 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 65.62748 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19806 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 452.9984 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.10346 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05044 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 12.2498 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05361 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 12.39515 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.22379 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.96823 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26052 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 103.04805 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.18626 Zimbabwe dollar

Coco farmers to withdraw TRO on levy

The Philippine Coconut Authority (PCA)  yesterday reported that the Confederation of Coconut Farmers Organizations of the Philippines (CONFED) is willing to withdraw its petition before the Supreme Court that led to the issuance of a temporary restraining order (TRO) on the release and use  of the P75 billion coco levy funds. 

PCA administrator Billy Andal and representatives from CONFED have agreed to do what needs to be done to benefit the farmers and develop the industry, PCA said. 

“I am  happy that a major stumbling block to the early disposition of coco levy fund is finally resolved with the CONFED declaration of withdrawal of the TRO,” Andal said in a statement.

“With this development, President Rodrigo Duterte can now dispose without much legal impediment considering that he promised the electorate, the farmers in particular, that he will release the coco levy fund in 30 days,” Andal added.

PCA said the coco levy funds, totaling P75 billion, were money and assets collected from the coconut farmers from 1973 to 1982.

Charlie Avila, CONFED executive director and spokesperson, said the petition was directed against the previous administration.

“We, in CONFED, believe that we have at last a government that means business for the benefit of coconut farmers and the development of the industry. We are willing to withdraw our petition before the court to give PCA a freer hand in governance,” Avila said. 

He added the precise nature of the ownership of the coco levy funds is not absolute ownership but trust ownership.

According to CONFED, the coco levy funds must be regarded as public trust funds since these resulted from taxation and trust ownership as they were levied for certain purposes and could not be disposed of in any way except to attain those ends or purposes. 

“Our government then may not now just do with the funds as it pleases because the funds do not belong to the general funds. They are special funds. Nor even can the farmers claim the funds in an absolute sense of ownership to do with as they please because these funds that came from them are still theirs only for a given purpose. The precise nature of these funds is therefore one of dual ownership,” Avila explained.

He added the government as collector of the funds owns them as trustee while the real beneficial owners are all coconut farmers who were specially taxed by the state for certain purposes. 

“We, the coconut farmers, believe that the coconut industry is one of the major industries that support the national economy. It is the state’s concern to make it strong and secure source not only of the livelihood of a significant segment of the population, but also export earnings the sustained growth of which is one of the imperatives of economic stability,” said Efren Villasenor, CONFED chairman.

Earlier, Andal had hoped the legislators can craft a law to finally release the coco levy fundsincluding the fund’s interest worth P4 billion before yearend. 

“My only request to them is that if the fund will take long to be released, we want to have at least the interest worth at least P4 billion. We want it to be fast tracked even if it takes us to plead to lawmakers,” he had said.

 CONFED is the unified group of coconut farmer organizations nationwide that include the Philippine Association of Small Coconut Farmer’s Organizations, Pambansang Koalisyon ng mga Samahang Magsasaka at Manggagawa sa Niyugan, Coconut Producer’s Federation and their many allied farmers’ organizations, representing more than 95 percent of the organized coconut famers sector in the country.
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