December 12, 2017, 12:56 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07278 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24757 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03528 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3421 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02639 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03528 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03964 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63231 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03302 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00747 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.69217 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01982 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02679 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13598 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06524 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01982 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27948 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20552 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 396.82854 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0396 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0255 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01967 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.99108 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13122 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 59.62339 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.156 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01982 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.85788 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43044 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.50505 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12534 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94034 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28612 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26346 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35183 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53538 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01684 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04147 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01479 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01479 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08907 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93459 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 178.43409 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14546 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.01804 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1547 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46587 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12671 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24044 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.28662 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 268.48364 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06983 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27788 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.46878 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 701.16946 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06938 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.47374 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01402 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24961 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04063 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.38206 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.68285 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.28543 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.83944 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.63231 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00598 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01625 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.6333 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 164.81665 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.84143 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.03469 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.47968 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27056 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06043 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0123 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02704 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18759 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34103 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.03171 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.9772 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.22597 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15934 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.97721 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.67096 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30426 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.14153 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37538 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08101 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27055 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.11596 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60852 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16439 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04432 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02898 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00763 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01982 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06409 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06435 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09514 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07069 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.87314 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07216 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07797 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.17163 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.55857 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07433 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15331 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26983 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13201 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16747 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0268 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0148 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44016 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 151.23885 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.08028 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 412.8087 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17344 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.20773 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27056 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64618 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04946 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04551 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07598 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13358 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59489 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.28147 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53697 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.63528 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01982 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57542 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 160.35679 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19772 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 450.12883 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.12071 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05137 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 11.04004 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05352 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 11.53221 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00932 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.95441 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27055 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.86422 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.17344 Zimbabwe dollar

Last-minute concerns hound TRAIN bill

Last-minute concerns over the final outcome of the Tax Reform for Acceleration and Inclusion (TRAIN) continue to mount even as the bicameral conference committee said it is 90 percent done with its effort to harmonize the disagreeing provisions of the  Senate and the House versions of the measure.

Sen. Sonny Angara, chairman of the Senate ways and means committee, said among those that remain unsolved are the proposed  tax on coal and cosmetic products.

But one important feature of the measure that the bicameral conference committee had agreed on is something that ordinary workers would  be happy about.

Higher cap

Members  of the  committee agreed on to increase the tax exemption cap of 13th month pay and other bonuses to P90,000.

Under current law or Republic Act (RA)  10653, the 13th month pay and other benefits, including productivity incentives and Christmas bonuses, are exempted from tax if they do not exceed P82,000.

Before RA 10653 was signed into law in 2015, only bonuses not exceeding P30,000 were tax-exempt.

The Senate version of the TRAIN retained the P82,000 tax-free cap while the approved version of the House of Representatives raised it to P100,000.

As compromise, members of the bicam, who are tasked to reconcile the differences of the two versions, have agreed to raise the tax-exempt ceiling to P90,000 effective starting 2018.

Bicam members have also agreed to exempt P250,000 annual taxable income of all individual income taxpayers.

The House contingent said they would not allow the Senate “insertions” as they maintained that all tax measures must emanate from the House of Representatives.

The House version did not impose tax on coal and cosmetics procedures and surgeries.

Angara said congressmen  insisted that higher tax rates for imported coal, as well as coal sourced from Semirara, will eventually affect power rates, as the country is heavily relying on coal-fired power plants.

The Senate approved a 3,000-percent increase in coal taxes to be collected in three tranches until 2020, which means the current P10 excise tax will be raised to P100 in 2018, P200 in 2019 and P300 by 2010.

The Senate also adopted a 10-percent excise tax on cosmetic procedures for aesthetic purposes. 

Senators also voted to double excise taxes on minerals and mineral products and quarry resources that proponents said was intended to promote “responsible mining and environmental protection.”

Coal tax

Over at the House of Representatives, Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez said the chamber will not allow the inclusion of the coal tax in the TRAIN bill as it would surely increase the price of electricity.

“Let us look at this objectively from the point of view of the consumers. If you impose additional taxes on coal-powered plants, the industry players may not complain because they’ll just pass it on to consumers,” he told  radio dzRH.

The Senate approved a 3,000-percent increase in coal taxes to be collected in three tranches until 2020, which means the current P10 excise tax will be raised to P100 in 2018, P200 in 2019 and P300 by 2020.

Alvarez said the Senate’s insertion of the tax coal tax in the TRAIN “runs counter to the constitutional mandate that all revenue measures must originate exclusively from the House of Representatives.”

He said it is clearly spelled out in the Constitution that tax measures should emanate from the House and the Senate ‘may (only) propose amendments or concur (with).”

“They (senators) can propose amendments if we will allow it,” said Alvarez, noting that aside from the expected hike in electricity rates, the coal tax would also hinder the growth of the country’s manufacturing sector.

In a two-page position paper to the House committee on appropriations chaired by Rep. Karlo Nograles (PDP-Laban, Davao City), the consumer group Alyansa ng mga Grupong Haligi ng Agham at Teknolohiya para sa Mamamayan, Inc. (AGHAM) also opposed the provision, saying this would the price of electricity “affects all persons in every household and every business.”

“Aside from being a basic necessity, affordable electricity is an important key to national development, economic growth and social progress. Additionally, all the members of AGHAM are consumers of electricity and will be directly affected financially by the passage of Senate Bill No. 1592 and House Bill No. 5636,” said AGHAM which was represented by former Rep. Angelo Palmones in the 16th Congress.

AGHAM said proposal imposing a nearly 3,000 percent hike on coal in three tranches “is overtly excessive and appears to be imposed as an environmental measure to prevent coal from being used as a fossil fuel by generating, manufacturing, and other large plants that require efficient and stable source of heat to produce an end-product.”

“In order to be a valid environmental measure, it should not be grossly discriminatory and excessive in nature. Otherwise, while we also support the reduction of the effects of greenhouse gases to alleviate climate change, the drastic increase in the excise tax on coal will gravely affect consumers – both industrial and manufacturing industries, whose competitiveness in the global market may be curtailed, as well as end-users who will ultimately shoulder this tax measure’s impact of increased prices for basic commodities – possibly even worse than the benefits our nation stands to gain by the proposed tax measure,” it said.

Auto tax

Ramon Lopez, secretary of the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) supports a lower increase in the excise tax on motor vehicles to cushion the impact on models entered under the Comprehensive Automotive Resurgence Strategy (CARS).

Lopez said a lower excise tax should apply to vehicles worth P1 million and below  but is particularly important for CARS models since these are locally-manufactured.

A higher volume of sales for these vehicles would mean more assembly that would translate to jobs and economic activity for other industries like parts manufacturing.

The House version slaps a 3 percent tax on vehicles with a net manufacturer’s selling price or importer’s price of P600,000 and below on the first year and 4 percent on the second.

The Senate  version, however slaps 4 percent on the first year.

Under the House version, vehicles worth P600,000 to P1.1 million will be taxed P18,000 plus 30 percent in excess of the value of the P600,000 while in the Senate version, vehicles over P600,000 to P1.1 million will pay P24,000 plus 35 percent of excess of P600,000, 

“I am for the House version because the increase in the excise tax on those valued at P600,000 is smaller… this is where the CARS models are. We could live with the Senate version, but that means the increase would be 10 (percent) instead of 6. This means the small cars within the P1 million range would be a little more expensive than in the House version,” Lopez said.

CARS models include the Vios of Toyota Motor Philippines Corp. and Mirage of Mitsubishi Motor Philippines Corp.    
    
“This is happening fast… Our TRAIN (Tax Reform for Acceleration and Inclusion). But I will go to (the version) which is more favorable to the concerned industry,” Lopez added.


He said a slowdown in the growth of the industry could result from a “super big” increase in tax.

But he nevertheless urged Congress to pass TRAIN to generate the necessary revenues to fund the Build, Build Build program of the government. -- J. Lopez, W. Vigilia, I. Isip



 
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