February 24, 2018, 8:18 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.01557 Euro
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.01371 Falkland Islands Pound
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.15011 Hong Kong Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07193 Saudi Arabian Riyal
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.02534 Singapore Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 146.36485 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.78074 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 381.75523 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16785 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.87876 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22325 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60368 Thai Baht
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07262 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12717 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.55966 Taiwan Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 United States Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 10.20986 CFA Franc (BEAC)
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Baby news from Vic, Jolina; two directors spar on social media

GREETINGS of congratulations poured in Monday, November 6 for actors Vic Sotto and Pauleen Luna.

Sotto made the announcement in his characteristic deadpan way on the GMA noontime show “Eat Bulaga!”

“Batiin ninyo si Pauleen,” the veteran comedian urged his co-hosts.

“Bakit, anong meron si Pauleen?” Allan K. retorted.

“Anak,” replied Vic.

Comedian Joey de Leon (@angpoetnyo), “Eat Bulaga” host and close friend of the couple, posted on Instagram: “Magpi-PINK ba kami kung hindi...it’s a GIRL for Pareng Vic and Poleng! Congratulations!”

The veteran comedian and Luna wed in January 2016. Vic has four kids from his previous relationships.

Tuesday, host Jolina Magdangal revealed in ABS-CBN’s morning show “Magandang Buhay” that son Pele, 3, is going to be a big brother.

“Nine weeks na po ako at kuya na po si Pele!” she said.

Magdangal and husband Mark Escueta have long wanted to give their son a sibling and the happy news was met with joy by her co-hosts Karla Estrada and Melai Cantiveros.

Meanwhile, directors Mike de Leon and Chris Martinez have quickly resolved their social media word war.

The filmmakers recently sparred on Facebook, with Martinez apparently taking offense at one of De Leon’s pronouncements on Facebook.

De Leon has been posting on social media about his movie “Citizen Jake” and its non-participation in the coming Metro Manila Film Festival (MMFF).

Martinez, who has an entry in the said film festival, addressed one of De Leon’s posts.

The exchange was posted by Martinez on the Facebook account of showbiz reporter Mell T. Navarro.

“For someone who has been gone for 17 long years, all of a sudden, you have a lot to say about this industry and its problems. Why choose to speak only now and be suddenly concerned bout the industry you left for almost two decades? Is it because you have this movie to promote?” he wrote on Facebook. “Wala kang pakialam kung sagasaan mo ang ibang director sa mga statements mo? What did you do while you were gone? What have you done besides resting on your laurels? Peque taught. Ricky Lee held workshops. Joey Reyes is a film professor. We remained in the industry and tried to solve the problems by continuing on and holding the line on all fronts – indie and mainstream. So after your long hiatus, you come here armed with one film and you expect us to treat you like a Messiah? I find this promo slant of yours opportunistic and antagonistic. Promote your work based on its own merits. Stop picking fights,” he continued.

De Leon responded: “Mr. Martinez, for your information, I did not just stop making films 17 years ago. I quit. I had been in the industry making films since 1975 and after Bayaning 3rd World in 1999, I decided I had had enough and so I quit. I decided to make one film last year for reasons I have already explained enough on this page. I was spooked by the return of the Marcoses and that we had just elected a President who thought that the Marcos regime was not all that bad. So I thought I would make one more film to express what I felt and still feel presently.”

The reclusive director also dropped a bomb regarding the December film festival.

“I’m not picking fights but how would you feel if you are practically offered a bribe to join the December festival,” he wrote on Facebook.

“…You judge me too harshly just because I have chosen to make another film at this advanced stage of my life,” he continued. “Does my age imply that I’m trying to be the industry’s messiah? Far from it. I am no leader, I am just one person who speaks my mind and happens to have made films that stand the test of time. Will you be able to say the same when you reach my age? Why didn’t I teach? Well, because I didn’t want to and I am not a teacher. Does that make me less of a cinema person? I chose to quietly work on film restoration, trying to save the films of my family’s studio (De Leon’s grandmother is Narcisa de Leon or Doña Sisang, who headed LVN Pictures. LVN stood for de Leon, Villonco and Navoa. – Ed.) And that took a lot of years. Yes, right now, I am armed with only one film that I am hoping will be shown to a wide audience. So I have a right to promote it. Then after that, I will probably disappear again for the next 17 years but I know I will no longer be around to wait for that. In the meantime, whether it is 5, 10, 17 or 20 years, I will always remain a film director. So I deserve to be heard.”

Martinez then acknowledged the elder auteur and called De Leon one of his “lodis” or idols.

“Dear Direk Mike, Know that I always look up to you. Your films have inspired me to pursue filmmaking. I admire you body of work. Believe me when I say you are one of my ‘lodis’,” a part of Martinez’ reply read.

The conciliatory post apparently served to douse the flames of anger with both directors sounding friendlier. It ended with De Leon being contrite and Martinez vowing to watch the elder director’s film “Citizen Jake.”
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Column of the Day

Rappler’s continuing saga

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‘Without a court TRO against the SEC ruling, Rappler’s accreditation in Malacañang was considered revoked.” – Senior Deputy Executive Secretary Menardo Guevarra.’

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Duterte does not understand media’s role in a democracy

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‘This is funny if it didn’t violate the constitutional guarantee of freedom of the press.’