April 26, 2018, 12:50 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07044 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01285 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03414 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3869 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02498 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03414 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03836 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59992 Bangladesh Taka
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1 Philippine Peso = 33.58228 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.025 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13157 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06531 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26103 Bhutan Ngultrum
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1 Philippine Peso = 383.96625 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03832 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02447 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.4346 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12071 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 52.91139 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.76908 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.72344 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3961 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.39145 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1164 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94764 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1869 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24445 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33832 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52167 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01562 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03879 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01369 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01368 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08493 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89893 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.6122 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1407 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.94879 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15041 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4519 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11558 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23341 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.85501 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 266.4557 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06754 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26972 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.70809 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 805.52361 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92079 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.37438 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01359 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06782 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.91408 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.31497 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.83161 Cambodia Riel
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1 Philippine Peso = 17.26122 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.47315 Korean Won
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1 Philippine Peso = 6.25738 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.78405 Lao Kip
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.31433 Moldovan Leu
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1 Philippine Peso = 25.29728 Myanmar Kyat
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1 Philippine Peso = 6.75105 Mauritania Ougulya
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.35542 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07476 Malaysian Ringgit
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.59455 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15025 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02693 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02661 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00738 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06167 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06232 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.21711 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06525 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 105.81128 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06981 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07297 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.17426 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.19889 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07192 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14921 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25758 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34621 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1621 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01369 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42589 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.33679 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.79785 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 382.92676 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16782 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.87687 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2317 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60153 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04709 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04287 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07793 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12937 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56552 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.65171 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.50153 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.73264 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54066 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 154.48792 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1138.30075 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 436.67051 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02071 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04846 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.24242 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05178 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.24242 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.85386 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.79287 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23169 South African Rand
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1 Philippine Peso = 6.94093 Zimbabwe dollar

Ivan talks about ‘bromance’ with James

MATTEO Guidicelli plays the lead role of a dedicated Muslim soldier who belongs to the Special Action Force (SAF) in the big-budgeted action-drama “Across the Crescent Moon,” written, produced and directed by Baby Nebrida, and turns Matteo into a full-fledged action star.

“I trained hard for my role and I did the stunts and action scenes myself,” he says. “The movie gave me the chance to work with Tito Christopher de Leon for the first time, whom I really admire so much as an actor. He plays my Muslim father in the movie and my mom is his real wife, Tita Sandy Andolong. The story is very timely as it’s about human trafficking and we have to save Filipinas who are kidnapped and sold to syndicates abroad. It’s also a love story as I fall in love with a Christian woman, played by theater actress Alex Godinez, whom I’ve known from way back. Playing her parents are Gabby Concepcion and Dina Bonnevie, who are against me because I’m a Muslim. Puro magagaling ang mga kasama naming veteran stars kaya we’re inspired to give our best also.”

Will he ask his inamorata Sarah Geronimo to watch the movie with him? 

“Of course, I’d like her to see it as I’m very proud of this movie which is not only entertaining as a hard action film but is also meaningful and timely as it tackles valid problems concerning our nation.”

Writer-director Baby Nebrida has nothing but praises for Matteo. “Masarap siyang katrabaho kasi kahit ang dami naming pinagawang mahihirap na eksena sa kanya, including big risky action scenes with explosions, he never complained,” she says. 
Why is the film’s title “Across the Crescent Moon”? 

“The crescent moon is the symbol of the Muslim faith while the cross represents Christianity. The film shows that there is unity in diversity. We can have different religious beliefs but can still co-exist in peace and harmony, as seen in the relationship of Matteo, a Muslim, and Alex, a Christian, who fight to uphold their love and marriage. We shot the movie on location in beautiful Tawi-Tawi and some unknown distant islands there, and I’d like to thank all the people who helped us, both Muslims and Christians, in the making of this movie.”

***

Ivan Dorschner belongs to the same batch of “Pinoy Big Brother: Clash of 2010” where James Reid emerged as the winner. Both of them were given supporting roles in ABS-CBN but their careers didn’t really prosper. 

James hit it big when he moved to Viva while Ivan decided to just go back to California. Now, he’s back in circulation and has moved to GMA-7, given his biggest break so far as one of the four leading men of Barbie Forteza in “Meant to Be.” 

“It was James who convinced me to return to Manila and make a showbiz comeback when we saw each other in L.A.,” says Ivan, who’s now 26. 

So does he expect that what happened to James’ career will also happen to him? 

“For sure, people would compare me to him, but between us, there’s no competition. We’re good friends and he’s very supportive of me. But I’ll just do my best on my own.” 

They’re so close folks say they have a “bromance.” “Well, bahala na ang mga tao kung gusto nilang lagyan ng malice ang friendship namin. Go ahead, it’s fine. Actually, James is also close to Bret Jackson, na kasama rin namin noon sa PBB. Kasi nawala ako, ‘di ba? At sila, naging magkasama sa Viva. But we’re all just good friends.”

So is he happy now with GMA? 

“Sobra. They gave me a really warm welcome at lahat kami ng cast ng ‘Meant to Be,’ nagkakasundo. I gained new friends here.”

The show’s very fashionable program manager Hazel Abonita says they’re very happy with the high ratings and very positive feedback that the show got in its pilot telecast. Congratulations!

***

Director Dan Villegas has the most enviable track record among young filmmakers today. All his films are acclaimed, starting with his indie debut in “Mayohan” which gave Lovi Poe a Cinemalaya best actress award. His subsequent mainstream films are all blockbuster hits and some also won awards for him as best director and acting awards for Jennylyn Mercado, Derek Ramsay and Jericho Rosales: “English Only, Please,” “Walang Forever,” “BreakUp Playlist,” “Always Be My Maybe” and “How to Be Yours.” 

After making nothing but romantic films, he now does a horror movie, “Ilawod,” for Quantum Films producer Joji Alonso, written by Palanca awardee Yvette Uy Tan. 

“Ilawod” means downstream. The story shows how the water elemental messes up the family life of a peaceful couple, Ian Veneracion and Iza Calzado. Ian is Dennis, a reporter who works for an online news publications that covers supernatural stories. Together with his photographer, Carlo, played by Epi Quizon, they cover a story of possession in the mountains. 

Unknown to Ian, when he returns to the city, he brings home the ‘Ilawod’ with him and it then possesses his wife Kathy (Iza Calzado), their daughter Bea (Xyriel Manabat) and youngest child Ben (Harvey Bautista). Their family then has to fight to save not only their lives, but more importantly, their souls. 

“This is definitely a new challenge for me kasi after doing love stories, mananakot naman ako ngayon ng viewers,” says Dan. “When I read the script of Yvette, nakita kong kakaiba ito kaysa sa usual fright stories about ghosts or vampires. The ‘ilawod’ here is a life force that is more terrifying than ghosts and the plot will grip the viewer from start to finish. So if you enjoy having a good scare, don’t miss ‘Ilawod’ when it opens in theatres on January 18.”
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