February 22, 2018, 4:54 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07045 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04297 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03415 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38059 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02443 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03415 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03837 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59409 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0304 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.58872 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02533 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13159 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06235 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2325 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18295 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 384.03989 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03832 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02429 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.018 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.42605 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12152 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.88202 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.87186 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.71801 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39493 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.3921 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11601 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94226 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17652 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24369 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33858 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52177 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01557 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03825 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01371 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01377 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08533 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89967 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.74122 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14073 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.9296 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15011 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45024 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11584 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.216 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.85824 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 261.23153 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06714 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24329 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.71245 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 713.12103 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9248 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.40936 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01359 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0619 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9413 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.3061 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 77.09572 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.62709 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.26453 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.55496 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00575 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.12565 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.52676 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.96605 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97621 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45904 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22463 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05848 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0119 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17647 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31853 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95396 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.47477 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.90946 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15451 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.71398 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62536 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29868 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.76098 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35911 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07494 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22327 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.88663 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59477 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15035 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98703 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02611 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00738 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06229 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0629 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11989 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06472 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.82716 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06982 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07256 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.0862 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.12737 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07193 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14866 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2582 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34501 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15536 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02534 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01372 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42597 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.36485 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.78074 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 381.75523 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16785 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.87876 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22325 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60368 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04586 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0428 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07262 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12717 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.55966 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.06541 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51746 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.67197 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54556 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 156.62766 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 478.3426 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 435.71839 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98465 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04817 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.20986 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05179 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.20986 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.85248 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.79474 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22325 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.5492 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.94226 Zimbabwe dollar

Managing expectations and disappointments (1)

I’ve never met a person who hasn’t lied. But that doesn’t make lying ok. 

I’ve never met anyone who hasn’t been disappointed. But being disappointed is ok. It’s normal. It’s part of life. We just have to learn how to manage it, and use it for good. 

Expectations and disappointments are conjoined twins. Or regular siblings handcuffed together for life. 

Any normal person has expectations of oneself and others. The question is — are our expectations too low, mediocre, sinusuwerte (a Purely Pinoy brand of expectation), sinister, hallucinatory, realistic, off the charts, or simply out of whack? Make sure your expectations are realistic.  
The more unrealistic our expectations, 
the more we will suffer when they’re not met. The more they’ll stir up unsavory emotions in us — like a frothy, foul cauldron of witches’ brew that carries its stench everywhere we go. 

For example, don’t expect a stone-hearted person to be suddenly compassionate. It’s just not logical. Save your exasperation for something else. Don’t expect your children to achieve what you weren’t able to. Or to succeed as much as you have. That’s not fair. They have their own lives to live. 

The worst progression is this: 

1) We have expectations.

2) We sometimes we get disappointed. 

3) This disappointment turns into resentment, anger, rage, hate, or bitterness. A poison that corrupts our relationship with God and others. 

4) Sometimes we want our pound of flesh. We want revenge. 

5) Our disappointments turn us into ugly, mean, bitter people. 6) And we eventually die lonely, miserable, alone. 

Sounds like a macabre fairy tale, right? Sadly, it’s not just a fairy tale. It happens all the time. Every single day. If you’ve been to a class reunion lately, just listen to the multiple conversations swirling around you. You’ll know who’s loved and happy. You’ll know who’s lonely, bitter, and alone (even if surrounded by people). 

One thing is certain: when disappointment devolves into something worse, it always wounds us...deeply. And more often than not, it also wounds those around us.

That’s why we have to learn to manage our expectations. And we have to learn to turn our disappointments into appointments with God. Believe me, this isn’t just a play on words. Or me just trying to sound clever. 

Remember: Every disappointment is an appointment with God.

1. When we invest something (time, talent, energy, resources), we must always be clear on what our motive is. Who are we doing this for? What is our desired outcome? Why are we investing? How much will we invest? What are our parameters for success? When do we stop
investing if the expected returns don’t come in? 

2. Before investing in someone or something, we must look at the worst-case scenario: Can I live with it? If you cannot, don’t invest. 

3. You have to do your due diligence, your background checks — is this person trustworthy? What’s his track record? What do others (who’ve worked closely with this person) say about him? Does he have integrity? Does he fear and love God? If you have a choice, invest in and work with people who share your faith, your values, your priorities. 

4. If circumstances are beyond your control and you have to work with people who don’t share your values (like if you’re employed in a company or organization), then decide beforehand that you will not compromise your personal values. Instead, influence others to uphold your values. But do not expect them to think and act according to your values. If they do, that’s a bonus! 

5. If you’re the boss, define clearly what your expectations are, and what the consequences are if they’re not met. Define your time line. Define the standards of quality you expect. Define the kind of work attitudes and team work you expect. Define the things that are unacceptable
 to you: dishonesty, lack of integrity, divisiveness, corruption, covering up mistakes, claiming credit for someone else’s work, mediocrity, laziness, irresponsibility, sabotaging people and their work, entitlement, work cliques, etc. Always remind your people of the consequences of falling short of these expectations. But also remind them constantly, of the rewards and additional support they can expect from you if they meet your expectations. 

6. If people aren’t your staff or employees, do not impose your standards and preferences on them. For example, if you’re the kind of person who is thoughtful and makes it a point to show your gratitude to those who’ve helped you, don’t expect the same kind of thoughtfulness and gratitude from others. You’ll just get disappointed. There are people who are just not big on showing gratitude. Maybe they’re proud, entitled, lack GMRC, or are just plain ungrateful. Who knows? But don’t waste your time feeling bitter that they’re ungrateful. Instead, think about all the good things they’ve done for you. Think about all their good qualities. Look at their ungratefulness as a weakness they need to work on. All of us have weaknesses and sinful attitudes that we need to correct. But don’t excuse them for their wrong behavior. See it for what it is — and use it as a reminder to yourself not to do the same thing to others! The lesson: don’t reward ungratefulness. Draw that  boundary next time. All things being equal, choose to give to the grateful person. 

7. If you’re investing in a person like your  spouse, your children, your close friends, think: what if, at the end of the day, they waste what I’ve invested in them? What if my spouse mistreats me or becomes unfaithful or wreaks havoc on our marriage — even if I give it my 100%?

What if my kids grow up to be selfish, thoughtless adults who won’t take care of me when I’m old and helpless? What if my business partner cheats on me when our business succeeds, or puts up his own company and pirates my best people? What if my boyfriend/girlfriend dumps me for someone else — after everything I’ve done for him/her, after everything I’ve sacrificed for this relationship? What if my best friend betrays me? What if my boss doesn’t appreciate me, doesn’t give me credit for work I’ve done? What if my boss just thinks of himself and doesn’t give me fair compensation — even if I’ve saved his face so many times? What if the very people I’ve helped, and stuck out my neck for, betray me? Or forget what I did for them? What then? Will I let this affect me negatively for the rest of my life? 

Sometimes, people don’t just disappoint us. They bury us. That’s when we need to rise above the ashes of betrayal or ungratefulness. 

How? By asking God to even up the score. he’ll do it because he’s all-just. Ask God to use the good we’ve done, in whatever way he can, to bless others. Goodness is goodness, no matter what people do to make it bad. 

8. When we’re disappointed, we need to ask ourselves: Why? Is it because my ego was deflated? Because I didn’t get what I wanted? Because it didn’t enhance my status, reputation, personal interests? If the answer is yes, then recognize that you’re disappointed because of selfish interests. You’ll get over it faster. 

9. If you’re disappointed because your work standards weren’t met, or because moral standards weren’t met — then change what’s changeable. Fire, reassign or transfer that person. Liquidate the business partnership (a friend of mine did this and was relieved of years of stress).

Stop investing time, trust and affection on a friend who’s doing you more harm than good.

10.  If it’s your spouse or children or permanent fixtures in your life who have disappointed you, then whatever good you’ve done for them, and will do for them — tell God, “Lord, this one’s for You! I’m doing this for you.” Just make sure you’re not enabling them or rescuing them as a habit. God won’t honor that. You’ll surely suffer the consequences. 

One of the most mind-boggling promises of God is this: if we do what’s right and what’s good for his sake, then no matter what happens, he will surely reward us. Guaranteed. Even if the people we’ve been good to are totally ungrateful or mean or foolish. God sees all the good things we do, and He Himself will reward us, if we do it for Him! It’s all in our motive: WHO are we doing it for? 

This is God’s tremendous promise, one of my all-time favorites: “Work willingly at whatever you do, as though you were working for the Lord rather than for people. Remember that the Lord will give you an inheritance as your reward, and that the Master you are serving is Christ.”  (Colossians 3:23-24) 

When you do good things with,  and for people, whatever you do — do it for God. He will surely reward you, even if people won’t appreciate you or reward you. 

Put all your expectations on Him because he will never fail you. And let him use your disappointments to give you wisdom, humility, and character. This way, even if your expectations aren’t met, even if you’re disappointed, you still win.
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