July 21, 2018, 11:06 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.0687 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01833 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03442 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51646 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02528 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0333 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03741 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57108 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03151 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00707 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.75309 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02527 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12832 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07203 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27899 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19255 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 374.4856 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03737 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02464 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01868 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.20576 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12563 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 53.5578 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.55649 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77142 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41506 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.32024 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11972 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93303 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19981 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25129 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33389 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51106 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01606 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03917 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01429 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01431 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08962 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.88982 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 168.66816 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14005 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.88103 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1468 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44747 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1187 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26057 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.20183 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 269.36027 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06796 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28159 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.25963 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 813.69248 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99588 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.43547 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01325 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11107 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.8771 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27484 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.70146 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.90311 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.83502 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.15413 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00566 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01534 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.4508 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.22035 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.15189 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98915 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 3.00412 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24822 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05703 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01161 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02573 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17723 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31076 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98373 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.78638 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.80995 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15122 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.64048 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64347 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29125 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.40105 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35353 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07589 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24819 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.7153 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58586 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15284 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04293 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02753 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00719 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06114 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06073 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.39618 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0692 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.97905 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06809 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07472 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.95267 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07015 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14747 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25122 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33483 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16573 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02554 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0143 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41538 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 153.38571 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.68088 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 393.68313 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16367 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.633 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24845 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62252 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04952 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04351 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08966 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12587 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57159 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.49906 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49158 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.56977 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58277 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 145.09914 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 2239.05724 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 431.12608 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04265 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04883 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.52881 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05051 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.52881 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.90591 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.67265 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24818 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.07258 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.76955 Zimbabwe dollar

‘Province of China’ banners cause social media uproar

ON the second anniversary of Manila’s victory over Beijing in the landmark South China Sea arbitration case, banners bearing the words “Welcome to the Philippines, Province of China” sprang up on bridges, overpasses and major thoroughfares all over the metropolis, sparking anger on social media platforms. 

The terms “province of China” and “South China Sea” trended prominently on Twitter, while news reports of the sudden appearance of the red tarpaulin banners along key thoroughfares generated thousands of shares and comments on Facebook.

No group claimed responsibility for the banners, which feature English and Chinese characters and a Chinese flag flanked by dragons. 

The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) said it has removed six banners from six bridges and overpasses, which it said distracted motorists. 

In a press briefing, MMDA general manager Jojo Garcia said the agency is checking out who posted the banners on Quezon Avenue, C5-Kalayaan Avenue, and along the Commonwealth-Philcoa area in Quezon City, Airport Road and Taft Avenue in Pasay, and España-Welcome Rotunda in Manila. 

Garcia said the banners were strategically placed in areas where there were no CCTVs. 

MMDA spokeswoman Celine Pialago said the agency’s cameras are fixed and there were no traffic enforcers on roads from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. 

Pialago said the MMDA only allows people or groups to post banners in public places once they obtain permits from the agency. Local government units also have ordinances against people or groups posting banners without permits. 

Garcia said the MMDA started getting reports about the banner as early as 6 a.m. 

Emojis denoting anger or surprise dominated comments on social media next to pictures of the banner. 

Former solicitor general Florin Hilbay posted a photo of the banner on his Twitter account, with the caption: “Not funny. On this day, July 12, we commemorate our victory in Philippines vs China. On Metro Manila footbridges, these tarps suddenly appear. MMDA, LGUs and citizens should immediately take these down.” 

Others chided the government for not challenging China’s assertiveness in the South China Sea. “This is too much. The country was sold off,” one Facebook user said.

Private citizens Ronald Gustillo and Ryan Pontejos likewise posted photos of the banners on their Facebook accounts.

“This was taken early this morning sa lugar ng Sun Valley, NAIA, Pasay City near Terminal 1 and 2. History major ako nung kumuha ako ng teaching units nung nag aaral pa ako. Sa pagkakaalam ko wala ito sa pinag-aralan ko or HINDI LANG AKO UPDATED SA PHILIPPINE HISTORY?! Pero nakaka Huwaw! Ang aga naman bumungad saken nito. Kelan pa naging PROVINCE OF CHINA ANG PILIPINAS?! Nabago na?! Advance kayo mag isip?! tsk..tsk..tsk,” Pontejos said in his post.

Gustillo said: “Anong kalokohan ito? Province of China pa eh no.” 

Some users accused the political opposition of making the signs to discredit the government’s warming ties with China.

Presidential spokesman Harry Roque called the banners “absurd” and said it was likely the government’s political enemies who were behind them.

“It’s absurd and I’m sure it’s the enemies of our government behind it. So to them: try again, you need a better gimmick than that,” Roque said.

Roque said there is no truth to the content of the banner as the Philippines has not given up any of its territory and has in fact “continue(d) to assert our sovereignty and sovereign rights.”

“But we are decided to move on issues which are non-controversial because we know that the final resolution particularly on the issues of sovereignty on the disputed islands will take many, many, many years to resolve since this was not a subject of the arbitral ruling that we won two years ago,” Roque said in explaining the current relationship of the Philippines with China.

Sen. Francis Escudero described the tarpaulins as “witty and annoying” as he shared Roque’s belief the banners were put up by critics of the administration and that these were meant to taunt President Duterte’s preference to be an ally of China. 

“Witty at nakakaasar na propaganda pero tiyak ko, hindi galing sa administrasyon dahil parang binaon nila ang sarili nila (It is a witty and annoying propaganda but I’m sure it did not come from the administration because doing so would only bury the administration deeper),” he said during the weekly Kapihan sa Senado forum.

“Bahagi ito ng paninira laban sa administrasyon na kaya na ni Harry Roque na depensahan (It’s part of a demolition job against the administration that Harry Roque could handle),” he added.

The Philippines and China have overlapping claims over parts of the West Philippine Sea/South China Sea. Under President Duterte, Manila has taken a conciliatory approach and wants China’s loans, trade and investments.

The President likewise frequently praises Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping and in February, caused a stir when he jokingly offered the Philippines to Beijing as a province of China.

On July 12, 2016, the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague ruled that China had no historic title over the waters of the South China Sea and it had breached the Philippines’ sovereign rights by blocking its fishermen and building artificial islands in its Exclusive Economic Zone.

The Duterte administration has set aside the ruling and pursued bilateral relationship with China. The government has not called out Beijing over the deployment of missile systems in the Fiery Cross Reef, Subi Reef, and Mischief Reef, which falls within the country’s exclusive economic zone. – With Jocelyn Montemayor, JP Lopez, Ashzel Hachero and Reuters 
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