June 24, 2018, 9:33 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06901 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02912 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03401 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5072 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02524 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03345 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03758 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57159 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03155 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00712 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.90079 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1289 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07111 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28053 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19402 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 376.17437 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03754 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02493 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01856 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.99061 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12218 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.75385 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57591 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77772 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41526 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33615 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12016 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92728 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1963 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25225 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33484 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51146 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01612 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03918 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08979 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87956 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.07178 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14072 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.87599 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14741 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44878 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11882 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24803 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.23224 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 264.43067 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06764 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27568 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.24728 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 798.38407 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03119 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45509 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01333 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06417 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89121 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28183 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.00526 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92522 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.91094 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.86622 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01541 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.38595 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.00451 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.292 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98572 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.74709 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25254 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05728 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01166 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1786 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3177 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98891 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.98647 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.97896 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15183 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.67042 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65295 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29256 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.4053 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37584 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07518 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25239 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.72679 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59207 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15205 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03401 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02719 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06134 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0609 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28222 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06966 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.55769 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06839 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07509 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18236 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.96073 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07046 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1479 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25235 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33738 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16635 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02551 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41725 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.94363 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.72905 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 394.98309 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16441 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67644 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25202 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61856 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04882 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04333 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08786 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12682 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56924 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.63435 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49267 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.51597 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59451 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.50094 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1499.4363 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 430.10147 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07159 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0488 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05073 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92165 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69466 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25241 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.51033 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.80008 Zimbabwe dollar

Gov’t wants MOA signed by Kuwait

THE Philippines is pushing for the immediate signing of a memorandum of agreement (MOA) with Kuwait on the rights of overseas Filipino workers (OFWs), which would include maintaining possession of their passports and constant access to their cell phones.

“We want them to allow our OFWs in Kuwait to hold their passport. Or at least, if they will not be allowed to hold their passports, they be deposited to our Philippine Labor Attaché in coordination with the Philippines Embassy,” said Labor Undersecretary Claro Arellano.

Arellano said the Philippine team headed for Kuwait on Feb. 28 will push for the OFWs’ rights in their negotiations with their Kuwaiti counterparts.

“Hopefully, by next week, we can already finalize this memorandum of agreement and, by second week of March, we can already have the signing between the Kuwaiti government and Philippine government,” he said.

Labor Secretary Silvestre Bello III said such policies may even be adopted in other countries employing OFWs

Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA) head Bernard Olalia said passports should really be in possession of OFWs or the Philippine government.

“The passport is owned by the Philippine government so it cannot be confiscated by anybody,” said Olalia.

DEMAFELIS

Bello has ordered the immediate recall of Labor Attaché to Kuwait Alejandro Padaen and Assistant Labor Attaché Lily Pearl Guerrero for their inaction on the case of slain OFW Joanna Demafelis.

Demafelis was the domestic helper whose body was found in a freezer last Feb. 9, a year after she went missing. An autopsy report showed Demafelis died due to several beatings. 

Her remains were flown back to her hometown in Sara, Iloilo last Sunday.

“I have already signed the recall order and depending on the evidence gathered by our International Labor Affairs Bureau (ILAB) they may also face administrative proceedings,” Bello said.

Bello earlier recalled Welfare Officer Sarah Concepcion over her alleged negligence on the case.

He said Padaen and Guerrero failed to give the proper explanation on their supposed inaction.

“There was no effort on their part to locate Demafelis when she was reported missing in early 2017,” said Bello.

President Duterte is scheduled to visit Demafelis’ wake today.

Presidential spokesman Harry Roque said Duterte has yet to decide on the invitation for him to visit Kuwait.

RECRUITMENT AGENCIES

The POEA has ordered the cancellation of licenses of 10 recruitment agencies while another one is suspended for four months.

The 10 are Al Bayan International Manpower Services Co.; Bumiputra Gulf Company Inc.; Gold Fortune Human Resources Corp.; LFC International Human Resources; Aisis International Manpower Incorporated; GreatWorld International Management Inc.; GlobalGate International Manpower Services Inc.; MMML Placement Services Inc.; SML Human Resources Inc.; and Best Migrant Workers International Manpower Services Inc.

On the other hand, the NRS Placement Inc. was slapped with a four-month suspension of license.

“These are only the initial list of pending cases of PRAs (Private Recruitment Agencies), who are employing workers bound to Kuwait. In the weeks to come, we will be resolving other pending cases,” said the POEA chief.

Bello said the increase in the number of deaths and abuses of OFWs could be attributed to illegal recruitment.

REPATRIATION

A total of 1,796 Filipino workers have asked to be repatriated.

The Overseas Workers Welfare Administration (OWWA) said it will be establishing a command center for the processing of claims, complaints, issues, and concerns of those who have just returned from Kuwait.

OWWA Administrator Hans Leo Cacdac said this is aside from the reinvigoration of their one-stop shop for returning OFWs.

Labor Undersecretary Ciriaco Lagunzad said the DOLE is developing a mobile application (app), which will soon allow OFWs to alert the government if they are being abused in their workplaces.

“We will be coming out with a web-based alert system, which OFWs can easily download. With just one push of the alert button, help will immediately come them. We intend to introduce the alert system in Kuwait,” said Lagunzad.

The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) said the two-month extension granted by the Kuwaiti government on its amnesty program will allow the Philippine Embassy in Kuwait to accommodate more of the 10,800 Filipinos believed to have overstayed or ran away from their employers.

“Only close to 3,000 of those qualified have applied so far,” said Foreign Affairs Secretary Alan Peter Cayetano.

With the extension, Kuwait’s amnesty program will now run until April 22.

Senators condemned the rising cases of abuse and death of OFWs. 

They said in Kuwait alone, 185 deaths were recorded in 2016.

Sen. Joel Villanueva, chair of the committee on labor, employment and human resources development, said the deployment ban should have been employed years ago to prevent abuses and deaths.

Sen. Cynthia Villar said the ban should also be imposed on countries where OFWs, mostly domestic household workers, are also facing abuses.

“We should stop the deployment of domestic workers since they comprised 80 percent of the problems facing OFWs, especially since some of them are being held against their will by their employers or being abused sexually. We should only deploy skilled workers,” she said.

Villar said government agencies should also come up with a computerized data base to track the whereabouts of the OFWs, especially domestic workers, so that they could easily be located by embassies and consulates if problems occur.

Senate minority leader Franklin Drilon said the hearing on the Demafelis case should serve as an opportunity to re-examine the government’s local and foreign labor policies.

Presidential adviser on OFW and Muslim concerns Abdullah Mama-o called for the abolition of the “kafala system” which requires employers to sponsor foreign workers, thereby making the latter vulnerable to abuse.

Mama-o said under the kafala system, foreign workers can only look for new jobs without prior approval from their sponsors after three years of service.

He said that due to the kafala system, employers control virtually everything that foreign workers do, such as his or her passports and even when he or she can go out of the house. – With Raymond Africa
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