February 26, 2018, 5:40 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.0709 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0666 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03436 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38512 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0246 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03436 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03861 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59981 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0307 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00727 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.8027 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13243 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06249 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24035 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18341 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 386.48649 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03857 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02437 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01807 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.38996 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12225 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.88417 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.92317 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.73147 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39788 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.41371 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11689 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94363 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19764 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24563 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34054 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5251 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0157 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03853 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01381 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01382 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08607 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.90347 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 173.55213 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14162 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.93494 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15101 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45448 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11653 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23243 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.90965 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 263.76448 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06723 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25268 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.85714 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 718.33978 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.93822 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4222 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01364 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0617 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.96236 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.311 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.94981 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.70077 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.37452 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.76255 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00578 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01583 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.1749 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 159.87839 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.06178 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.99421 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.50386 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22268 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05886 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01198 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0257 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1777 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.32037 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.96332 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.79151 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 46.1583 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15547 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.75676 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.63514 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29614 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.77317 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35764 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07562 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22261 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.9112 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59556 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15133 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99853 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02647 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00743 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06266 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06071 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.13127 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06552 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 107.39382 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07027 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07302 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.08832 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.23803 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07239 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14989 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25792 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34575 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15762 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02545 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01382 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42869 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 147.2973 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.84942 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 384.74904 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16892 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.9417 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22262 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60579 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04633 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04271 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07317 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12974 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56444 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.35907 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52008 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.40541 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54923 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 157.72201 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 558.39769 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 438.97684 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05502 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04818 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.28822 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05212 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.28822 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.87297 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.82336 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22278 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 100.1834 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.98649 Zimbabwe dollar

Australians to train Filipino troops?

US Ambassador Sung Kim last week vigorously denied that his Government, through the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), wants President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong ousted.

It will be recalled that Digong recently claimed the CIA wanted him out of the government and that if he is killed, the agency would be to blame.

Kim stressed his government’s commitment to the Philippines with continued military and humanitarian assistance.

He added that President Donald Trump will discuss “all important issues” like North Korea, maritime security, recent developments in Mindanao, economic ties and strengthening of cultural and people-to-people ties with Digong when he visits Manila next month.

No human rights?! Well, well, well…

Perhaps it would be as good a time as any for Digong to flag to Trump that he intends to re-visit the Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA) and the Enhanced Defense Cooperation Agreement (EDCA) at an appropriate time in the near future.

It would be most interesting to see how Trump reacts to it.

I mention this again because both agreements are a derogation of our sovereignty. And if Digong’s much-vaunted independent foreign policy were to remain credible, he has to pursue it with greater consistency. He cannot keep on changing his mind about his past pronouncements. 

For instance, he reportedly authorized the resumption next year of the Balikatan military exercises with the US in its original form which he had previously ordered stopped because he said they weren’t necessary and consistent with the new foreign policy. As I said in a previous column, consistency is key to the successful pursuit of an independent foreign policy.

AUSTRALIANS TO TRAIN FILIPINO TROOPS?

“Australian Forces to train Filipino troops on urban warfare” – Headline

Shouldn’t that read “Australian Forces to train WITH Filipino troops on urban warfare”?

I ask this because I do not recall any urban warfare taking place anywhere in Australia in recent memory. Unless, of course, the soldiers they will send have had experience and have actually engaged in urban warfare elsewhere in the world. Then that’s a different story.

On the other hand, our soldiers who fought in Marawi must have gained so much experience in urban warfare in five months that Australian troops could learn from them.

Recently retired AFP Chief Gen. Eduardo Año said it took a while for our soldiers to “adjust and shift their tactics” at the start of the fighting in Marawi.

 “It’s very different because the terrorists were exploiting the use of solid structures, basements and they’re able to maximize the use of snipers, improvised explosive devices, bombs and then they used civilians as human shields. We will come up with a new doctrine on how to fight in urban warfare,” Año told the Associated Press.

I’m sure our troops and the authorities concerned would only be too glad and willing to share those experiences with Australia and other interested allies. 

DUAL CITIZENSHIP

Mr. Barnaby Joyce has been disqualified as deputy Prime Minister and member of Parliament of Australia for having dual citizenship. He has since renounced his New Zealand citizenship.

Four senators with dual citizenship sitting in Parliament were also disqualified.

Politicians, diplomats and other officials and employees serving in government agencies that deal with foreign governments should not have dual citizenship. Logic dictates their split allegiances could adversely affect the national interest.

In this regard, it is common knowledge that there are/were a number of government officials and employees, notably in the Department of Foreign Affairs, who have/had dual citizenships. That should henceforth be strictly banned. 

OPIOID EPIDEMIC IN THE US

The recent announcement by Trump that the opioid epidemic in the US which he called a “national shame” and “human tragedy”, is really not new. 

More than two months ago, on August 11, 2017 to be exact, CNN reported that Trump declared the day before that the opioid crisis is a “national emergency”.

Here is what I wrote on the matter in my column of August 15, 2017:

“Buried under the headlines created by US President Donald Trump’s ranting about ‘fire and fury’ threat against North Korea and that the US is ‘locked and loaded’ as the former readies its missiles, is Trump’s statement about the opioid epidemic in the US. Opioid is an opiumlike compound.

‘The opioid crisis is an emergency, and I am saying, officially, right now, it is an emergency. It’s a national emergency. We’re going to spend a lot of time, a lot of effort and a lot of money on the opioid crisis. It is a serious problem the likes of which we have never had,’ Trump said.

“According to a CNN report, from 2000 to 2015, more than 500,000 people died in the US of drug overdoses and opioids account for the majority of those.

“No wonder Trump once told Digong he understands the latter’s war against illicit drugs.”

Hopefully, the bleeding hearts in the US will henceforth look more kindly and with greater understanding at our conduct of the war against illegal drugs, given the big difference obtaining in the political and socio-economic situations in the two countries.

THE MILE-LONG PROPERTY

Not only was Digong able to recover the Mile Long property in Makati from the Prieto-Rufino family… the people will also benefit from the back taxes estimated at P2 billion that the court has ordered the family to pay the government.

Neither Gloria Arroyo nor Noynoy Aquino was able, or even deigned, to do that. It had to take a probinsiyano from Davao to pull it off. 

And his detractors have the temerity to say there is no change in Digong’s administration?! Naman…! 

Incidentally, many are wondering what ever happened to the plan of tycoon Ramon Ang to buy the Inquirer broadsheet from the Prietos.

CHRISTOPHER ‘BONG’ GO

Digong is really of a different mold compared to all his predecessors. For one thing, he is the only president with an ubiquitous shadow in the person of his Man Friday, Cristopher “Bong” Go who has the title of Special Assistant to the President and is head of the Presidential Management Staff and the Office of the Appointments Secretary.

Wow! Does he even find time for himself or his family?!

People wonder what lurks in the mind of the poker-faced Go. But one thing is quite obvious – he has the absolute trust and confidence of Digong. That, people say, makes him the most “influential” and “powerful” person in the country after Digong himself.

***

QUESTION: Why do the Yellows like the color yellow?

ANSWER: Because the official color of the royalty in Brunei and in Thailand is yellow and they think they are the royalty in the Philippines.

***

Today is the 180th day of the eleventh year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper.

After the acquittal of Major Harry Baliaga, Jr., the only person formally charged with Jonas’ kidnapping, I guess what happens next is now up to Divine Providence.

***

From an internet friend:

Two married friends are out drinking one night, when one turns to the other and says, “You know, I don’t know what else to do. Whenever I go home after we’ve been out drinking, I turn the headlights off before I get to the driveway. I shut off the engine and coast into the garage. Take my shoes off before I go into the house, I sneak up the stairs, get undressed in the bathroom, stick my foot in the toilet and pee down my leg to prevent splashing sounds. I ease into bed and my wife still wakes up and yells at me for staying out so late.” 

His friend looks at him and says, “Well, you’re obviously taking the wrong approach. I screech into the driveway, slam the door, storm up the steps, pee hard into the toilet water, then use the full flush, throw my shoes in the closet, undress in the bedroom, then jump into bed, slap her on the butt and say ‘Who’s horny?’

She always acts like she’s sound asleep. Works every time!”

***

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