June 21, 2018, 8:46 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06897 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04526 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03404 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52113 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03343 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03756 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57728 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03184 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00709 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.88225 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02522 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12883 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07009 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.277 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19573 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 375.96244 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03752 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02494 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01868 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.01146 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12169 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.86948 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.59718 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78854 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41869 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33333 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12088 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93052 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20053 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25367 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33502 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51117 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01621 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03897 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01426 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01425 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08833 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87962 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.05164 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14052 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.88526 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14739 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44866 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1197 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23812 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.22103 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 261.46479 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06819 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27817 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.23474 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 796.99531 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05333 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4507 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01331 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06607 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89577 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28255 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.84601 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92488 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.90141 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.8492 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0154 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.40488 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.33333 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.26291 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.00282 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.66254 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2584 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05725 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01165 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02546 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17921 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31576 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99324 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.69014 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.33333 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15181 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.66667 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65765 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29239 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.39812 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3853 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07515 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25797 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.74178 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59151 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15379 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0385 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0272 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06164 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06142 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28545 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06993 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.70047 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06835 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07565 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1966 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.95174 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07042 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14841 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25277 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33719 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16718 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01426 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41701 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.29577 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57277 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 397.4216 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16432 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67099 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25817 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61446 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04845 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04326 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08905 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12487 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56648 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.59155 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49596 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.33803 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59211 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.69953 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1498.59155 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 429.12676 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02911 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04869 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62592 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0507 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62592 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92432 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69202 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25823 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.4554 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.79624 Zimbabwe dollar

The Ayungin Shoal incident

HALF of the tandem that was responsible for our losing Panatag Shoal, ex-Foreign Sec. Albert “Super Amboy” del Rosario, the other half being ex-President Noynoy Aquino, said President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong needs “fuller briefings” on the West Philippine Sea/South China Sea (WPS/SCS) situation. 

I agree, considering the news report that Foreign Sec. Alan Cayetano told a House committee hearing last May 30 that Digong had given “strong instructions” about the harassment incident in Ayungin Shoal. 

“We filed a protest regarding that. We had a meeting. The President had strong instructions,” Cayetano reportedly told a House committee hearing on May 30. 

The incident has to do with a Chinese military helicopter buzzing a Philippine Navy vessel that was bringing fresh supplies to the handful of Filipino marines manning Ayungin Shoal on board a grounded, rusting vessel.

However, when Digong was asked about the incident upon his return on June 5 from South Korea, he said it was the first time he heard of the report.

He claimed he was unaware of the incident and was surprised when told about Cayetano’s statement.

Obviously, that prompted Digong to say that Cayetano and his department have no power to file diplomatic protests against China without his approval.

“DFA does not on its own do a policy. It’s the Office of the President. And so they just implement. It’s the sole organ of the foreign policy of this country lies with the Office of the President,” he said.

“I don’t know about that incident. I was busy talking to Korean officials. What kind of harassment in the first place before — before I commit myself to answer the question, what kind of harassment was this? This is the first time I’ve heard of it. It would be dangerous for me to answer questions without really having the slightest idea of what it is all about,” he added.

I tend to believe that Digong really was not aware of the incident. That could only mean he was not briefed by Cayetano about it beforehand. 

Was it because he had no chance to do so? Was it a simple case of omission? Or worse, was it deliberate on his part for reasons known only to him?

Yes, Del Rosario is right. Digong should get fuller briefings not only on the WPS/SCS situation but also on other important matters. Needless to say, Digong should make time for such briefings.

In the meantime, let’s watch what Digong does about Cayetano’s apparent lapse.

RUSSIAN WARSHIPS

Soon after British and French warships plied in the South China Sea in support of the US’ move to ostensibly ensure freedom of navigation in the area, three Russian warships docked in Manila for a “goodwill visit.” 

The visit came in the wake of what Chinese President Xi Jinping hailed as “unity” of the security bloc China leads with Russia, the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO). 

Xi made the statement last weekend during the opening of the (SCO) summit in Qingdao, China, where Russian President Vladimir was in attendance. 

I think the presence of the Russian warships in the region was precisely timed to demonstrate support for China’s position in the South China Sea in response to the British and French action. 

CARPIO’S PROPOSAL 

Acting Chief Justice Antonio Carpio said the Philippines could lodge another complaint before the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) for the Chinese Coast Guard’s (CCG) alleged bullying of Filipino fishermen at Panatag (Scarborough) Shoal. 

In my view, if the report is confirmed, we should definitely protest against the CCG’s action. That is not the way to treat a friend.

However, I do not believe that filing another complaint before the PCA is the way to go. Based on its ruling on our previous complaint, the tribunal will most likely back us up. Ergo, hiring lawyers for the additional complaint will not be cost effective. The previous complaint, reports say, cost us US$7 million (about P350 million). 

Also, a favorable PCA decision will simply be ignored by China as it did the ruling on the previous case. 

What is the use then of filing another case? 

BONG GO 

I have a couple of questions about the Mocha-Kris tussle over “that kiss:” 

1) Why was Digong, through his man Friday Bong Go, so quick to apologize to Kris? Is it because Go is supposedly a friend of Kris who previously said she will support him in his senatorial bid next year, although he has been saying he is not running at all? Go also apologized to Kris.

2) What will Go now do or say? He assured Kris during the press conference he called that Mocha will also apologize to her. Later, Mocha categorically said she won’t. On his part, Digong said he will not ask Mocha to apologize as she was only exercising her right to free speech? 

Incidentally, Go’s face has been blurred in nine photos taken during the departure of Digong for South Korea published by social news and blog site POLITIKO on June 3? The photos were courtesy of Malacanang. Question is who did the blurring, POLITIKO or Malacanang?

***

REMINDERS

This segment is intended to remind the Duterte administration of some of its yet unfulfilled promises and matters that need attention and/or follow-up action. More importantly, the people are entitled to know what’s being done about them.
1) Digong’s promise to rid the country of foreign troops. This, of course, necessitates re-visiting the lopsided VFA and the EDCA with the US. 
2) Reciprocal visa arrangements with the US and other countries. (What is the DFA doing about this? Our embassy in Washington?)
3) The retrieval of the Balangiga bells. (Sources say the return of the bells is now awaiting a certification of some kind from the US Defense Department to be submitted to the US Congress. Is our embassy in Washington on top of this?)
4) The return of the Canadian waste. (Sources say the DOJ has filed a motion before the proper court for the importer to return the waste to Canada. No decision yet. No word about what Canada is doing.)

***

Today is the 45th day of the 12th year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper, Joe Burgos.

After the acquittal of Major Harry Baliaga Jr., the only person formally charged with Jonas’ kidnapping, I guess what happens next is now up to Divine Providence.

***

From an internet friend:

Tommy was sitting in math class when suddenly his teacher asked him, “Tommy, how much is 2 + 2?” 

Tommy, caught off guard, begins counting his fingers under the table mumbling to himself: “1…2…3…4,” before happily exclaiming “the answer is four!” 

“That’s correct,” said his teacher, “but I saw you counting your fingers instead of doing the math in your head. So I want you to put your hands in your pockets and tell me what you get if you add 5 + 5.” 

Tommy put his hands in his pockets and his teacher saw him looking at his pants and moving his lips without uttering a word until finally the teacher became impatient and said: “I see what you’re doing there and I can tell you right now that the answer is not eleven!” 

***

12 June 2018
Email: roacrosshairs@outlook.com
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