May 27, 2018, 2:01 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06987 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04394 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03405 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46707 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02507 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03386 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03804 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.58684 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03178 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00718 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.30759 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01902 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02521 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13049 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06941 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01902 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2997 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18862 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 380.82557 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.038 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02456 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01888 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.92087 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1215 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.23245 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.69241 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01902 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.79018 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41871 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.37645 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12092 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.9416 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20987 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25394 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33993 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51779 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01623 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03907 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01422 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01425 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08823 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89024 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 171.23835 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13955 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.93875 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14924 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45305 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11993 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23264 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.18261 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 268.49914 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06761 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28921 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.52235 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 800.64676 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00476 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.38368 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01348 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08195 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.91839 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2975 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 77.23036 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.96595 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.12003 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.46376 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00575 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0156 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.24805 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.41735 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.6285 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.00552 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.59102 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23569 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05799 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0118 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02586 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18008 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31929 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99391 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.77516 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.76412 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15373 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.73388 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65627 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29618 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.63553 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37196 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07566 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23683 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.82899 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59717 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15404 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06962 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02745 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00732 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01902 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0621 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06201 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19897 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06975 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 108.10348 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06924 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0751 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.17631 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.13468 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07134 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15092 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25547 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34155 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16566 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02546 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01422 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42241 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.32471 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.69051 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 397.78391 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16644 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.79608 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23678 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60662 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0483 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04363 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08961 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1286 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56886 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.27563 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49705 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.0291 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01902 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5933 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 151.83565 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1494.25528 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 433.30797 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03595 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04914 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.63667 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05136 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.63667 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.926 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.75366 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23681 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 98.716 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.88415 Zimbabwe dollar

Battle of the Super-Dudes

HE was too late to stop the Anschluss.

And Martin Niemöller’s arrest in Germany, Fascist bombing of Guernica, Polish ultimatum to Lithuania, Los Angeles flood of 1938, the order to sterilize “colored” children in Germany, Battle of Gandesa, Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann’s accidental discovery of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and the 1937 Texas Tragedy as well as “Arawareta Kingu Kongu: Henge no Maki” (King Kong Appears in Edo: The Episode of the Monster), Marco Polo Bridge Incident, and the Rape of Nanjing.

Earth’s best-known first-responder made his debut on April 18, 1938 (publication date) when he rescued Lois Lane from a gangster, saved a woman being beaten up by her husband, and terrified a Senator into confessing his corruption.

Superman’s freshman exploits (as well as “The Adventures of Marco Polo” and Zatara Master Magician and Scoop Scanlon the Five Star Reporter, among others) were featured in the National Allied Publications’ Action Comics #1. The extraterrestrial superhero (and his Earthling persona of Clark Kent) graced the first 13 pages of this comic book anthology, which also contained Captain Frank Thomas’ text feature on the “South Sea Strategy.”

Superman in his first appearance established a pattern of trying to fix racketeering, mine disasters, and other socio-economic problems of people in the real world of America from the Great Depression onward. [Sandy Berman, in-house curator for the Breman Museum’s traveling exhibition, “Zap! Pow! Bam! The Superhero and the Golden Age of Comic Books 1938-1950”] Incidentally, “Hitler proclaimed Superman a Jew and prohibited the comic book in Germany; in Italy, Mussolini banned all but his favorite, Mickey Mouse.” [https://www.neh.gov/humanities/2006/julyaugust/feature/zap-pow-bam]

Who were the preferred “Übermensch” of the Germans, Nazis and Fascists? “The Austrian ‘Anschluss’ filled Germans with national euphoria. German Christian church governments took advantage of the propitious situation in order to contrive to require pastors to swear an oath to Hitler after all. This had been thwarted in 1934. On March 14, 1938, the Thuringian Evangelical church enacted a church law requiring its pastors to swear an oath, as did the Mecklenburg regional church two days later. Saxony and the Evangelical Church of the Old Prussian Union, which comprised nearly half of German Protestantism, followed on the ‘Führer’s birthday’, April 20, 1938.” [The Hitler Oath; https://en.evangelischer-widerstand.de/html/view.php?type=dokument&id=65]

Church bells at Branau rang out greetings on Adolf’s 40th birthday, and the “Deutsche Allge-meine Zeltung” compared him with Frederick I. (Barbarossa), Emperor of the Holy Empire and ruler of Germany, whose name is “cherished in the Reich as the greatest German in history.” [The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 21 April 1938, page 11] At the Yorkville Casino in New York City, a riot erupted at a meeting of the German-American Bund where American Nazis were celebrating Hitler’s 49th birthday. [http://skepticism.org/timeline/april-history/5231-riot-erupts-in-new-york-city-when-american-nazis-celebrate-hitlers-birthday.html]

Five birthdays later, Goebbels’ annual greetings for his boss (available in any German newspaper of 20 April 1943) opened: “The German people celebrate the Führer’s birthday this year in a particularly somber manner. This fourth year of the war has been the hardest yet, and an escape from its burdens and sorrows, or its end, is nowhere in sight. Its enormous political and military events span all five continents. Wherever one looks, peoples and nations are affected by its pains and sacrifices. Hardly a nation has been spared the grave political and economic impacts of this vast military drama.” [http://research.calvin.edu/german-propaganda-archive/unser43.htm]

The Nazi propaganda-meister had cause to be funebrial. “Adolf Hitler, public enemy number one to most of the world, celebrated his 54th birthday today and Americans hoped it would be his last. They said so in no uncertain terms in ‘greetings’ which they would like to have sent, but could not, conditions being what they are. In verse and in prose, the man on the street, screen, stage and radio stars, statesmen and others joined in a ‘hate parade’ of wishes and insults.” [Madera Tribune, Number 44, 20 April 1943]

To make matters worse for the birthday boy, the Warsaw Ghetto erupted in armed resistance to Heinrich Himmler’s plan to eliminate the entire Jewish Ghetto of the Polish capital as a “nice” gift to his High Muckamuck. Himmler’s initial German, Polish and Ukrainian attack forces were routed by the Passover uprising. The European Nazis took six months to burn out Mordechai Anielewicz and his comrades, reducing the area to rubble. Who won, who lost? “The significance was that it was the first armed resistance by the Jews. The ghetto fighting showed that resistance was possible, that our people were willing to fight. They died in the end anyway, but they died with a different feeling.” – Marek Edelman, MD [https://www.nytimes.com/1973/04/20/archives/warsaw-april-19-1943-the-ghetto-battle-is-on-part-of-larger.html]

SS Brigadeführer Jürgen Stroop took command of the “Großaktion” in the Warsaw ghetto on April 19, 1943 and his Report on the Nazi operation was used as evidence by the prosecution at the Nuremberg Trial of the Major War Criminals, leading to his conviction and execution on September 21, 1951 in Warsaw. [http://ghdi.ghi-dc.org/sub_image.cfm?image_id=3774]

While Hitler’s natal day was being “celebrated” in Europe, one of Adolf’s Oriental counterparts was handed his just deserts. The “Asian Devil” (Japanese Imperial Navy Admiral Yamamoto Isoroku, mastermind of Tokyo’s sneak attack on Pearl Harbor) was successfully targeted by American “Operation Vengeance” whereby a Japanese G4M Betty bomber carrying the Commander-in-Chief of the Combined Fleet was gunned down by a Lockheed P-38G Lightning of the 339th Fighter Squadron. Thus, the first anniversary of the famous Doolittle Raid was observed. “Tally Ho X Let’s Get The Bastard.” – U.S. Pacific Fleet commander Vice Adm. William “Bull” Halsey

Cost-effective justice? “Yamamoto represented more than a position in an organization. He was truly unique, irreplaceable. His elimination had long lasting effects in terms of Japanese morale and will. At the same time, US military leadership by no means expected the mission would end the war, but understood that it was necessary to helping achieve a larger cumulative effect.” [Killing a Peacock: A Case Study of the Targeted Killing of Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto: A Monograph by Major Adonis C. Arvanitakis, United States Air Force, 2015-01]

Remember: in Action Comics #58, c. 1943, Superman Says: You Can Slap A Jap, With War Bonds and Stamps!
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