April 25, 2018, 3:05 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07044 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01285 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03414 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3869 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02498 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03414 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03836 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59992 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03047 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.58228 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.025 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13157 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06531 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26103 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18432 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 383.96625 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03832 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02447 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.4346 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12071 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 52.91139 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.76908 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.72344 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3961 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.39145 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1164 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94764 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1869 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24445 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33832 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52167 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01562 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03879 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01369 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01368 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08493 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89893 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.6122 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1407 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.94879 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15041 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4519 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11558 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23341 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.85501 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 266.4557 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06754 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26972 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.70809 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 805.52361 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92079 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.37438 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01359 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06782 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.91408 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.31497 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.83161 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.65286 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.26122 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.47315 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00575 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.25738 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.78405 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.8646 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.99962 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.50441 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23188 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05847 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0119 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02539 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17621 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31433 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95589 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.29728 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.79977 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15492 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.75105 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64212 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29862 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.71883 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35542 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07476 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23032 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.88531 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59455 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15025 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02693 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02661 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00738 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06167 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06232 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.21711 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06525 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 105.81128 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06981 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07297 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.17426 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.19889 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07192 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14921 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25758 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34621 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1621 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01369 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42589 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.33679 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.79785 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 382.92676 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16782 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.87687 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2317 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60153 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04709 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04287 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07793 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12937 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56552 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.65171 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.50153 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.73264 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54066 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 154.48792 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1138.30075 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 436.67051 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02071 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04846 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.24242 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05178 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.24242 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.85386 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.79287 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23169 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.53011 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.94093 Zimbabwe dollar

Cosplay correct

KUDOS to Pablo and Tania O. Bairan of cosplay.ph for this year’s “Cosplay Man!a.” The 45,000 attendees (5,000 of them in costume) embody passion, curiosity and the pursuit of happiness. Here now are items of reality about cosplaying in general:

(1) Reiko Kondo, founder of L.A.’s premier cosplay artist agency, about the opportunities in this fast-growing field that looks at fictional and animated character representation in a different way: “Obviously the history of costuming in masquerades, holidays, and other rituals is present in most cultures from ancient times, but the popularity of cosplay today really started to grow when younger generations discovered anime.” [James Longley, May 4, 2017, http://www.backstage.com/]

(2) “Tokyo is a city that usually prides itself on being well turned out. But a carnival-like scene has been going on for years now in Harajuku and Yoyogi Park with Elvis dancers, coifs flying and grease dripping, and girls dressed up in fluffy dresses from the 1950s. Cosplay – short for costume play – dominates the scene. The costume trends emerge from nowhere. One week the panda look is all the rage, then it’s back to the French maid or Lolita look, which morphs into Goth, forming ‘Gothlolly’.” [John Lander, “Fashion conscious; Young people doff their drab daily dress and adopt new and sometimes bizarre identities as part of the weekend ‘Cosplay’ crew in Tokyo’s Harajuku district,” Toronto Star, 06 June 2009]

(3) “Stone’s analysis of the transformative quality of fantasy costumes adopted by children at play during their early phases of socialization has relevance to the process of dressing up in costume as a general activity amongst people of all ages across a range of contexts from theater, festivals, and masquerade events to fan-based subcultures or neo-style tribes.” [Anne Peirson-Smith, “Fashioning the Fantastical Self: An Examination of the Cosplay Dress-up Phenomenon in Southeast Asia,” Fashion Theory: The Journal of Dress, Body & Culture, Vol. 17, Issue 1, February 2013]

(4) “Sometimes people are miscast in life. They may appear to be dentists or clerks, but deep down they are actually fierce swordsmen or goddesses with devastating sex appeal. These true selves can emerge in the world of cosplay, the practice of impersonating characters from anime, manga, Japanese video games, and other realms of fiction.” [“The Anime Within,” Mother Jones, Nov/Dec2007, Vol. 32, Issue 6]

(5) “I’ve been able to help chapters and members understand how intellectual property law works; and once I got my LLM in e-commerce and technology, I was able to further reinforce those issues.” [Jenny B. Davis, “This lawyer is using her love for ‘Star Wars’ to expand the galaxy of geeks,” ABA Journal, December 2015]

(6) “We chose a myth. If you grew up in a religion, so did you—or, rather, a myth was presented to you, a story that speaks to a culture in a specific time and a specific place, generally with a finite set of motifs. Creation, destruction, or hero’s journey. Every one of us was handed a myth, and these are things that before TV, before movies, when we were young, our elders would have sat us down and said, ‘Here’s where the world came from. This is a story about a villain. Don’t act out these behaviors. This is the story of a hero. This is the way you should behave.’ And there will be a set of images that accompany it. These stories help you make decisions about how you want to live your life, but the language of the story also predicates your relationship with whatever it is you hold sacred, your notion of the transcendent. And if you are a Christian or a believer of one kind or another, it involves God.” [Jack Hitt, “The Circle Is Now Complete: Alex Bird, a Real-Life Jedi, Brings the Force to Life,” Virginia Quarterly Review, January 1, 2017]

(7) “Other prominent examples of cosplay in Japan include the Gothic/Lolita groups, who in addition to dressing elaborately, appropriated and repurposed traditional Japanese women’s speech and etiquette. Kogyaru and ganguro cosplay eras featured a unique collection of fashion, but was dominated by extensive ‘blackface’ and high-contrast makeup and hair schemes, tanning, and visually enlarging the eyes. That era may have died into a different sort of role-play and cosplay — bihaku, or the maximization of whiteness and pale qualities, especially following notable celebrities...Understanding manga, pachinko, and cosplay encourage broader discussions about global cultural dissemination and the Japanese brand.” [Kinko Ito and Paul A. Crutcher, “Popular Mass Entertainment in Japan,” Society (2014) 51:44–48]

Cosplay.ph, the Philippines’ largest cosplay events and management company, conducts its business with a single credo in mind: “Do right by everyone.” With this principle guiding each one of the organization’s efforts, the company has grown from a team of 8 passionate friends to a business that employs over 150 contractors, staging more than 10 events per year. Other matters of interest this week:

(1) “It’s kind of too late to be really – just to harangue them. But I was, under advice that the negotiations are going on, that the government of America is looking for ways how to get out of this problem of the Balangiga bells because it remains to be not only the source of irritation but the source of a painful reaction of what really happened to our countrymen...Order of Lapu-Lapu. Kasi itong mga taga-Maynila masyadong mga hambugero rin. Lahat ng mga hero, puro taga-Luzon. Si Dagohoy, si Lapu- Lapu, who – siya ‘yung unang pumatay ng imperyalista. Si Magellan, pinutulan niya ng ulo. Anong ginawa nila sa hero’s natin? Ginawang Lapu-Lapu, isda...So I hope that Congress of America will give the President Trump the authority to return the bells to us. [Speech of President Rodrigo Roa Duterte during his Attendance to the 116th Commemoration of Balangiga Encounter Day, Delivered at the Balangiga Encounter Monument, Balangiga, Eastern Samar, 28 September 2017]

(2) “During the open forum held after each performance of the play “Project Balangiga” by the Ma-Yi Theater Company (New York City, August 2002), several young Filipino Americans profusely thanked the Company for talking about the Philippine-American War. These Filipino Americans, most of whom were college students, did not know much about the War nor did they have an extensive knowledge of the history of colonization in the Philippines. Current studies in Filipino American history focus mainly on issues of migration, assimilation and integration rather than on the Philippines colonial history. Thus, though they knew of the assimilation struggle of the migrant farm workers, they were not aware of the struggle of the Filipinos in the Philippines against American imperialism.” [Joi Barrios, “A Hunger for History: A Study of Ma-Yi Theater Group’s ‘Project Balangiga’,” MELUS, 29.1 (Spring 2004), pp. 253-280]

(3) “On September 28, 1901, in the town of Balangiga, Samar, as the Company C of the 9th U.S. Infantry Battalion occupied the town, Filipinos rose up against the Americans, killing 36 soldiers and wounded 22 others. It would be known by the Americans as the Balangiga Massacre, considered as Samar’s most ‘glorious achievement’ during the Philippine-American War. In retaliation, the American forces led by U.S. Brigadier General Jacob Smith, reduced Samar to a ‘howling wilderness,’ killing civilians over ten years old. This led to a U.S. congressional investigation and trial.” [Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Office. Heroism, Heritage And Nationhood. San Miguel, Manila: Malacañan Palace, 2016, p. 224]
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