May 28, 2018, 5:47 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06987 UAE Dirham
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.03405 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46707 Argentine Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06941 Brazilian Real
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1 Philippine Peso = 11.92087 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1215 Chinese Yuan
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1 Philippine Peso = 2.20987 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25394 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33993 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51779 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01623 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03907 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01422 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01425 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08823 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89024 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 171.23835 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13955 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.93875 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14924 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45305 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11993 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23264 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.18261 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 268.49914 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06761 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28921 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.52235 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 800.64676 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00476 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.38368 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01348 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08195 Japanese Yen
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1 Philippine Peso = 17.12003 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.46376 Korean Won
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1 Philippine Peso = 6.24805 Kazakhstan Tenge
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.31929 Moldovan Leu
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1 Philippine Peso = 25.77516 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.76412 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15373 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.73388 Mauritania Ougulya
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.29618 Maldives Rufiyaa
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.37196 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07566 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23683 Namibian Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.59717 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15404 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06962 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02745 New Zealand Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.01902 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0621 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06201 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19897 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06975 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 108.10348 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06924 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0751 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.17631 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.13468 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07134 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15092 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25547 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34155 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16566 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02546 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01422 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42241 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.32471 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.69051 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 397.78391 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16644 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.79608 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23678 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60662 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0483 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04363 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08961 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1286 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56886 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.27563 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49705 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.0291 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01902 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5933 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 151.83565 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1494.25528 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 433.30797 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03595 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04914 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.63667 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05136 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.63667 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.926 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.75366 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23681 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 98.716 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.88415 Zimbabwe dollar

The Dengvaxia autopsies

One critical aspect often sidelined in the Dengvaxia scandal is the question of informed consent and the absence of requisite prescreening and analysis prior to injecting a vaccine harmful to certain children. The design of the Dengvaxia vaccination program crafted by the Department of Health (DOH) attuned itself to special interests quite apart from those of the children to be vaccinated. This made all the difference.

Should we add the labelling of necessary precautions and counter indications, and the determination of preconditions that exempt specific children from a vaccine with the potential for aggravating pre-existing illnesses, then the manner by which government carried out its program condemns it.

All the trials, studies and papers written on those harmful effects not only confirmed what Sanofi Pasteur, through its own trials, admitted to in 2015, but each compels with increasing alarm the criticality of prescreening and informed consent. More so where the target market is vulnerable young children and a population fallen to blindly trusting institutions.

Serotype prescreening would have exempted the DOH’s so-called 20% seronegatives within an endemic population from Dengvaxia’s harmful if not fatal effects should that percentage even be a credible ratio. Unfortunately its basis was two small sample areas -- totally unrepresentative, statistically flawed, even dishonest.

The question of the absence of informed consent goes even deeper. Its basis is a patient’s right to be informed, to know attendant risks of medical procedures, to consent to or refuse treatment. The World Health Organization (WHO), even the DOH, recognize and uphold this.

No patient, parent or guardian can give valid informed consent without being educated about the treatment before-hand.  In this program, as designed and carried out en masse by the DOH, the parents were not fully informed of possible anaphylaxis, severe dengue or even death.

The DOH deliberately traded these rights off for political expediency.

The consequences of those decisions are exemplified by four Dengvaxia autopsies.

Our source data are the death certificates and autopsy reports on four children exhumed and subjected to forensic analysis. All were vaccinated with Dengvaxia during the campaign period of the 2016 national elections. Not one was over 11.

In each, we presume regularity. Quoted verbatim for terms enclosed under quotation marks, medical terms are used and mis-spellings occur. Where critical, we’ve provided some definitions. The point is to array the death certificates against autopsy findings, however technical terms might seem.

The first child’s initial death certificate declared the immediate cause as “Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy” and the antecedent cause as “Severe Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever”. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy (DIC) is a blood disorder referring to how blood clots form throughout the body and block smaller blood vessels.

The autopsy report showed the immediate cause of death to be “Multiple Organ Failure”, the antecedent cause as “Dengue Shock Syndrome”, and under “significant conditions contributing to death”, the report noted “Dengvaxia vaccination with signs of Viscerotropic-like Disease; Antibody-Dependent Enhancement (ADE) mechanism”.

A viscerotropic disease is an acute multiple organ failure that results from a vaccination. In both the initial death certificate and the autopsy report, the cause of death through to the antecedent cause are all consistent and result from a dengue infection. The ADE in the autopsy report indicates the child might have been seronegative.

The second child’s initial death certificate showed the immediate cause as “Intractable Metabolic Acidosis”, and the antecedent cause as “Systemic Lupus Erythematosos (sic) (SLE)”. 

The autopsy showed the immediate cause as “Acute Respiratory Failure”, the antecedent cause as extensive “Pulmonary Haemorrhage” and the “underlying cause” as “Viscerotropic-like Disease Secondary to Dengvaxia Vaccination”.

If the child had SLE then the immediate and antecedent causes in the death certificate and the autopsy report are consistent with SLE. It is only the autopsy report’s notation under “underlying causes” that refers to Dengvaxia.

The third death certificate showed the immediate  cause as “Acute respiratory failure”, and the antecedent cause as “Pulmonary congestion Underlying cause: End stage renal disease”. 

The autopsy revealed the same immediate cause, the antecedent as “Extensive Pulmonary Haemorrhage and Necrosis” and as  “underlying cause, “Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia/ Lymphoma, favor B Cell type, and Viscerotropic-Like Disease secondary to Dengvaxia vaccine”. 

The report notes “Significant Condition/s Contributing to Death” were “Severely Immunocompromised and Inoculation with Live Attenuated Virus Tetravalent Vaccine (Dengvaxia)”.

The fourth child’s death certificate showed “Sepsis 2” as the immediate cause, “Intra Abdominal Infection” as the antecedent cause, and the underlying cause as “Acute Ruptured Appendicitis Electrolyte Imbalance”. 

The autopsy revealed the immediate cause as “multiple organ failure”, the antecedent as “Multiple Organ Dysfunction and Haemorrhage”, and the underlying cause as” Viscerotropic-like Disease Secondary to Dengvaxia Vaccination”.

Therefore, one child was seronegative. Severe dengue from ADE makes sense there. He might still be alive had he been pre-serotyped.

Three bore pre-compromised immune systems that should have exempted them from a Dengvaxia vaccination. Causes of death remain attributable to those, however, the impact of a Dengvaxia effect is unestablished due to the time elapsed from vaccination to affliction.

Since Dengvaxia contains weakened Yellow Fever viruses and resulting viscerotropic disease occurs within three  days of vaccination, viscerotropic effects would have occurred within days, not months later. Unless we are seeing a novel strain we’ve never seen before.

Because the DOH tanked critical prescreening and informed consent requisites, the DOH condemned one and, sadly, sealed the fates of the rest.
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