June 21, 2018, 2:20 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06897 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04526 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03404 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52113 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03343 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03756 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57728 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03184 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00709 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.88225 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02522 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12883 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07009 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.277 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19573 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 375.96244 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03752 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02494 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01868 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.01146 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12169 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.86948 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.59718 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78854 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41869 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33333 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12088 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93052 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20053 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25367 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33502 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51117 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01621 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03897 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01426 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01425 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08833 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87962 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.05164 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14052 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.88526 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14739 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44866 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1197 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23812 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.22103 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 261.46479 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06819 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27817 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.23474 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 796.99531 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05333 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4507 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01331 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06607 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89577 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28255 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.84601 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92488 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.90141 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.8492 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0154 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.40488 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.33333 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.26291 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.00282 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.66254 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2584 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05725 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01165 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02546 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17921 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31576 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99324 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.69014 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.33333 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15181 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.66667 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65765 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29239 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.39812 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3853 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07515 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25797 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.74178 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59151 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15379 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0385 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0272 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06164 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06142 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28545 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06993 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.70047 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06835 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07565 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1966 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.95174 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07042 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14841 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25277 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33719 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16718 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01426 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41701 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.29577 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57277 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 397.4216 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16432 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67099 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25817 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61446 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04845 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04326 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08905 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12487 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56648 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.59155 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49596 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.33803 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59211 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.69953 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1498.59155 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 429.12676 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02911 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04869 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62592 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0507 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62592 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92432 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69202 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25823 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.4554 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.79624 Zimbabwe dollar

Duplicity

RECENTLY, US Ambassador Sung Kim reiterated that his government is working “very hard” to return to us the Balangiga bells which were taken by American troops after slaughtering everyone who was ten years old and above in Balangiga town in Samar. 
The retaliatory massacre took place in l901 after US troops in Balangiga were defeated by our mostly bolo-wielding “revolucionarios” fighting for independence. 
Many other US envoys before Kim have given the same assurance but nothing has come out of it. 
By happenstance, General Antonio N. Sotelo (ret.), a genuine hero of EDSA I and former commanding general of the Philippine Air Force, gave me permission to publish the following piece that he wrote on the “Duplicity in US Foreign Policy” that should give the reader a glimpse of how the US “speaks one way and acts another”: 

QUOTE… 
Hereunder are quotations from the book “The Tragedy of Great Power Politics (Updated Edition)” by John J. Mearsheimer: 
 “ … In essence, a discernible gap separates public rhetoric from the actual conduct of American foreign policy. 
 “It should be obvious to intelligent observers that the United States speaks one way and acts another. In fact, policymakers in other states have always remarked about this tendency in American foreign policy. As long ago as 1939, for example, Carr
pointed out that states on the European continent regard(ed) the English speaking peoples as ‘masters in the art of concealing their selfish national interest in the guise of the general good’, adding that ‘this hypocrisy is a special and characteristic peculiarity of the Anglo-Saxon mind’.”
After reading and understanding the quotations above, did you ever believe what the United States had been telling us when we were embroiled with China on our territorial claims in the West Philippine Sea? 
Read the book “The Imperial Cruise” by James Bradley. You will find that the seeds of the 2nd World War in the Pacific were planted by the duplicity of American foreign policy. 
In our Revolution of 1896, we were deceived by America. We thought all along that once the Spaniards were defeated, we would have our country. Instead, America bought us from Spain for a token price of $20 million which translates to $0.66 per hectare with one Filipino standing on the land. We were no better, in fact worse, than the black people sold at the auction block in New Orleans as slaves. 
In World War II, Filipinos fought side by side with the Americans, in a war not of our own making. We were told every carabao killed, every coconut tree felled will be compensated. When the war was won, our veterans were treated shabbily. They were worth only half a person, perhaps, because in their eyes we were no better than slaves. 
Today, thanks to President Digong, or whatever name you call him. He brought us to a position where we can stand tall as an independent country. Yes, we are poor but we have our dignity back, not the lapdog of anyone. For that alone, he is my hero. 
At this point, this is a warning. We should be wary about people pretending to be nationalists but agents who are in the payroll of a foreign power who, seemingly, are espousing our national interest but in fact promoting the interest of their benefactor. These people are part of the intelligentsia. You read their articles in newspapers. You see them on television and other broadcast media. You find them in high society. They are well dressed in coat and tie or barong. 
Between these people and our President, I will take our President anytime. I have complete faith in him. He will not sell us out. 
End of quote… 

TRUMP ON JERUSALEM 

As expected, US President Donald Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the
capital of Israel was met with near-universal condemnation by Muslim countries in particular, and other members of the international community. 
The US also found herself isolated in the UN Security Council during an emergency meeting last week as fellow members, one after the other, criticized Trump’s decision as being inconsistent with past UN resolutions, including one that says Jerusalem is Israeli-occupied. 
Protests and clashes in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, Gaza Strip, Jerusalem and other Palestinian territories erupted, with two Palestinians killed and dozens injured near the Gaza Strip. 
Huge demonstrations also reportedly took place in countries like Jordan, Malaysia and Turkey. 

JERUSALEM AS
INTERNATIONAL CITY 

There have been proposals for Jerusalem to be declared an international city because of the presence of three of the holy shrines of the world’s three major religions – Christianity, Islam and Judaism. 
The following are located in the city: 1) The Church of the Nativity which is venerated by Christians as the birthplace of Jesus; 2) The Wailing Wall, Judaism’s most sacred site; and 3) The Dome of the Rock which is a Muslim shrine that is part of a larger Muslim holy area in East Jerusalem.. 
The Palestinians want East Jerusalem, which was seized by Israel in 1967 and annexed in 1980, to be the capital of a future state of Palestine. Unfortunately, Israel has already unilaterally decided that the whole of Jerusalem is her state capital. 
Expect the repercussions or fallout from Trump’s decision to be so consequential as to overshadow the brewing trouble in the Korean peninsula. 
Good or bad? Only time will tell. 
In this regard, it would be interesting to know what will be the position of our government on Trump’s declaration. 
China and Russia favor West Jerusalem as the Israeli capital and East Jerusalem as the capital of a future state of Palestine. 

ROBREDO CHANGING COLOR? 

Is Vice President Leni Robredo, whose election is under protest, changing her color or to put it more bluntly, is she now distancing herself from the Yellowtards? 
First, she says those responsible for the Dengvaxia anomaly must be made to account for it. 
According to news reports, it was ex-President Noynoy Aquino who allegedly “personally negotiated” (he reportedly went to Paris in December 2015) the deal with Sanofi Pasteur, the manufacturer of the defective anti-dengue vaccine that has now endangered the lives of young Filipinos vaccinated with it, numbering about 800,000. 
Justice Secretary Vitaliano Aguirre has ordered the National Bureau of Investigation to probe the anomaly that would include Aquino. I suppose a case against Aquino, former Health Secretary Janette Garin, former DBM Secretary Florencio Abad and possibly others will be filed, depending on the results of the investigation. 
 (In contrast, newly-appointed Health Secretary Francisco Duque III wants to hear from Aquino and Garin first… “I’m sure they actually meant well. I have no doubt that they did mean well,” he said. Whose side is he on?) 
***
Second, Robredo unconditionally backed President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong’s declaration of the Communist Party of the Philippines and the New People’s Army (CPP-NPA) as a “terrorist organization”.
“For me, what’s the definition of a ‘terrorist’? A terrorist sows fear without any reason. Terrorists are also those who kill civilians and extort money from them,” Robredo said.
She added that there should be no politics in fighting terrorism “because it will harm people’s security and the future of our country”.
It’s a good statement. But what about her Liberal Party mates? Are they in agreement with her? The people would be interested to hear from them.
***
Today is the 222nd day of the eleventh year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper.
After the acquittal of Major Harry Baliaga, Jr., the only person formally charged with Jonas’ kidnapping, I guess what happens next is now up to Divine Providence.
***
From an internet friend:
There is a new study about women and how they feel about their asses. The results are pretty interesting:
30 percent of women think their ass is too fat; 10 percent of women think their ass is too skinny; the remaining 60 percent say they don’t care, they love him, he’s a good man and they wouldn’t trade him for the world…
Just kidding guys, we know you have a sense of humor, right?
***
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