November 22, 2017, 1:25 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07222 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.23697 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.035 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34334 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02609 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.035 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03933 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63992 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03265 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00741 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.27689 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01967 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02668 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13491 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06405 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01967 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28171 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20626 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 393.707 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03929 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0252 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01953 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.51721 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13055 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 59.27237 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.06096 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01967 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.84798 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42782 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.47748 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12472 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93215 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.25679 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26216 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34612 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53196 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01676 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0411 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01485 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01485 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.09043 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92566 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 176.89283 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14439 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.01731 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15359 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46264 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12608 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.21691 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.23442 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 266.33236 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06904 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28012 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.94985 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 692.86138 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03638 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.46903 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01391 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.2151 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03441 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.37082 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 78.99705 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.32547 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.69912 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.59685 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00593 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01613 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.50443 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.16618 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.60669 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.02262 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.44897 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2763 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05995 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0122 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02689 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18578 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34307 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.02635 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.80433 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.94494 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15822 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.90266 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6647 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30619 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.0885 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37348 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08155 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27622 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.00098 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60177 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16317 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03638 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02891 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00756 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01967 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06359 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06374 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06568 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07087 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 110.87513 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07473 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07785 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.16841 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.36755 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07374 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15449 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26735 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13097 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16686 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0267 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01486 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4367 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.85251 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.99312 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 410.64307 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17207 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.12743 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27624 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64562 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04905 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04547 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07723 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13037 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59133 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.93314 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51976 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.28811 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01967 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57699 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 158.89873 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19617 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 446.39136 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.10089 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05108 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.98368 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0531 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.988 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98682 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.91504 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2763 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.05507 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.11701 Zimbabwe dollar

Duterte-Trump meeting

WHEN he was campaigning for the presidency, then Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong boldly stated that if he wins, he will have no more than five members in his retinue when he goes on official travel abroad.
I didn’t take that literally because I knew that was hardly possible. But I took the statement to mean that only those cabinet members and officials of agencies whose functions are directly related to the matters to be taken up with the country to be visited will comprise the official delegation. Security, media and other essential personnel will, of course, be there as unofficial members of the presidential party.
Included in almost all of the official trips abroad of Digong as seen on TV and print media were people who could not have had any official function to perform by virtue of their position in government. 
For instance, in the latest trip to Japan, included were Senator Chiz Escudero and his actress wife (they were also there in a previous trip); Senator JV Ejercito; Congressman Luis Villafuerte; presidential adviser on something, musician “RJ” Jacinto; and most notably Liberal Party member (has he bolted the party?) and Noynoy Aquino friend, former Speaker Sonny Belmonte. 
Oh, someone told me he spotted Digong’s college roommate Perfecto Yasay, Jr. seated at the presidential table during the dinner hosted by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. What was his role in the delegation to deserve such an honor? Yasay was rejected by the Commission on Appointments as Digong’s foreign secretary for lying about his American citizenship.
Through this space, I would like to request whoever is in charge of the implementation of Executive Order No. 2, also known as the Freedom of Information Order, for a list of both the official and the unofficial members, including hangers-on, of the presidential entourage to the last trip to Japan, as well as the total cost incurred by the government for their board and lodging, transportation, per diem, etc. The people have a right to know how their money is being spent.
Lest I am misunderstood, I remain a supporter of Digong and his policies. But, as I have stated in the past, I will not refrain from writing about promises he has broken and other things he does or doesn’t which, in my view, could erode the trust and confidence the Filipino people have vested in him, especially at this time when an SWS poll shows fewer Filipinos believe he can fulfill his promises.

THE OLIGARCHS
AND MANILA’S 400

“I am fighting a monster, the oligarchs. But believe me, I will destroy their clutches sa ating bayan.” – Duterte
Last week, Digong vowed to make the oligarchs in the country pay the proper taxes.
He was addressing himself to the so-called Manila’s 400 that comprises the country’s ruling elite whom he says he disdains “for enjoying the benefits of governance, protection and all, using public streets and not paying any money using government property”.
Digong also deplored the “condescending attitude” of the “400” who “use money and influence to get what they want but evade tax payments”.
“They do not pay taxes and they expect government to kneel down before them because they hold power. They have the publications and they have everything. So are the millionaires who contribute to the campaigns,” he said.
“Kasi kung ayaw talaga ninyong bumayad, noon siguro. But ngayon, sinasabi ko, ayaw ko ng corruption,” he added.

CHINESE PRESIDENT
XI JINPING

“He can be emperor for life – staying in power as long as his health allows,” said Willy Lam, an adjunct professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong’s Center for China Studies.
He was referring to Chinese President Xi Jinping whose name and ideology (“Xi Jinping Thought on Socialism with Chinese Characteristics for the New Era”) have been enshrined into the Communist Party constitution of China, thus putting him on the same level as the country’s founder Mao Zedong. 
Xi is now considered the “most powerful Chinese leader since Mao”.
“Xi Jinping Thought” will henceforth have to be studied not only by members of the ruling Communist Party, but also by schoolchildren, college students and workers in state factories.
According to a CNN report, Xi declared in his speech before the National Party Congress last week that China should “take center stage in the world”, that its brand of socialism offers “a new choice for other countries” and that “no one should expect China to swallow anything that undermines its interests”.

DIGONG-TRUMP MEETING

The Philippine Star yesterday quoted an unnamed official supposedly close to Digong as saying that the latter is very excited about meeting US President Donald Trump next week during the East Asian Summit.
“He is excited. And it is not only him but other officials who will be with him as well, when the two shall meet. He is overwhelmed,” the official reportedly exclaimed.
May I ask why?

RECIPROCAL VISA ARRANGEMENTS

Digong and Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez have previously said they would like reciprocity on visa matters with the US. 
Right now, Filipinos have to pay US$160 (P8,160 at US$1 = P51) for a tourist visa to the US. Americans can visit the Philippines without one.
I ask again – is Foreign Secretary Alan Cayetano doing anything about this? Perhaps he should instruct our new ambassador to Washington to give this matter priority attention. 
Needless to say, reciprocal visa arrangements should also be pursued with other countries.
***
Today is the 187th day of the eleventh year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper.
After the acquittal of Major Harry Baliaga, Jr., the only person formally charged with Jonas’ kidnapping, I guess what happens next is now up to Divine Providence.
***
From an internet friend:
An old, tired-looking dog wandered into the yard. I could tell from his collar and well-fed belly that he had a home.
He followed me into the house, down the hall, and fell asleep on the couch. An hour later, he went to the door, and I let him out. The next day he was back, resumed his position on the couch and slept for an hour.
This continued for several days. Curious, I pinned a note to his collar: “Every afternoon your dog comes to my house for a nap.”
The next day he arrived with a different note pinned to his collar: “He lives in a home with four children – he’s trying to catch up on his sleep. Can I come with him tomorrow?”
***
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