July 23, 2018, 9:19 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06891 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99812 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03452 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51726 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0334 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03752 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57017 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03144 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00709 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.85141 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01876 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02546 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12871 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07076 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01876 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.29362 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19433 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 375.60976 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03748 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02466 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01861 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.39231 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12694 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 53.79925 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56379 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01876 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.76454 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41373 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33021 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11925 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92946 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.2063 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2502 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3349 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51238 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01599 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03929 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01427 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0143 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08965 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.8925 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.1182 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14047 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.89268 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14725 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44908 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11833 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26435 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.20544 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 271.57598 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06798 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28997 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.32645 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 817.63602 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99062 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.44371 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01329 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09036 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.88462 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27979 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.96623 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.86454 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.88555 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.13321 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01538 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.50019 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.69231 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.24578 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.99906 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.82176 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25122 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0572 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01164 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02582 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17712 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31191 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98124 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.07317 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.94747 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15166 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.66041 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64259 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29212 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.38537 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35681 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07617 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25131 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.73546 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58799 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1534 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06473 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02754 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00721 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01876 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06142 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06111 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.40338 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06911 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 107.46904 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06831 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07438 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1907 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.006 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07036 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14815 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25182 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33678 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16626 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02554 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01428 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41662 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 157.41088 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.69418 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 392.12008 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16417 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.66191 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25104 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62495 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04951 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0442 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0899 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12621 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57388 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.58912 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49568 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.09381 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01876 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58555 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 145.53471 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 2245.77861 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 432.49531 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06942 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04922 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.49099 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05066 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.49099 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.90938 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.68762 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25122 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.36398 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.78987 Zimbabwe dollar

Fallacious

HE has yet to formally take up his position as ambassador, but already Jose Romualdez gives the impression he will be no different from his predecessors in Washington.

In a recent TV interview, Romualdez was quoted as saying that the Duterte administration’s independent foreign policy is not new but that it is more emphasized this time.

 “It’s a kind of policy that I think has always been around but it’s just more emphatic this time,” Romualdez said. 

Huh? I have been around long enough to know that what he said is so fallacious that it boggles the mind. 

Or is it just him? That being pro-US is equivalent to having an independent foreign policy? For that’s what we have been since the Republic was born in 1946 – being inordinately and unabashedly pro-US that, among other things, kept us out of the Non-Aligned Movement for a long time during the Cold War. We were looked down upon as a pariah in the developing world and nothing more than a US stooge.

So, pray tell, how could something that everyone knows had not been there be “more emphatic this time”?

And now, Romualdez says the US role in Southeast Asia is crucial. Everyone knows that. But it would be good for him to remember what his immediate boss, Foreign Secretary Alan Peter Cayetano said:

 “Do not pretend that you’re (US) protecting the Philippines. You’re protecting your interest.”

As I wrote last week, our diplomatic representation in Washington should absorb and digest what Cayetano succinctly defined as an independent foreign policy.

Romualdez, therefore, would be well-advised to bear that in mind and not be influenced by his previous and present close association with sundry firms, groups and personalities both here and in the US. His main concern should be the promotion and protection of Philippine interests – of the majority of Filipinos, not only of the elite and the pro-American sectors of our society.

PH-US RELATIONS

US Ambassador Sung Kim obviously has a keen understanding of how PH-US relations should be pursued – more focus on the ground with initiatives and programs for cooperation and making sure that their economic engagement remains strong.

Kim also said he was not surprised that the Philippines is seeking to improve its relations with China.

“The fact that the Philippines would want an improved relation with China is not surprising and does not, in any way, undermine our relationship with the Philippines. I think, in fact, all countries in the region would want to have smooth relations with China,” Kim said.

He likewise said he believes that the Philippines and any other country should pursue an independent foreign policy.

HUMAN RIGHTS

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson will reportedly raise as of this writing (August 6) US human rights concerns when he meets with Philippine officials over the weekend. 

I hope Tillerson does not raise the question and relate it to the campaign against illegal drugs of President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong. That would certainly raise the latter’s hackles once again over US interference in our domestic affairs.

In any case, the Department of Foreign Affairs said that the Philippine Government is keen on correcting Washington’s perception of Duterte’s war on drugs, based on “exaggerated” reports.

“We welcome the opportunity to address their concerns and correct the perceptions they may have gleaned from exaggerated media reports,” the DFA statement read.

EX-PRESIDENT AQUINO

I do not blame Digong at all for calling ex-president Noynoy Aquino stupid (gago) after the latter said nothing is happening in the former’s war against illegal drugs.

Surely, Noynoy knows that the horrifying drug problem we now have did not happen when Digong took over a year ago. It could have taken place only during his six-year watch. For instance, how many huge shabu factories, one of which was in his own turf (Tarlac), were discovered and shut down soon after Digong took over? They could not have been built overnight. 

In this regard, I think former Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa, Noynoy’s czar against criminal syndicates which no doubt include the drug cartels, should be requested to shed some light on the drug menace.

Perhaps Ochoa could also be requested to share what he knows about the Mamasapano Massacre. He was previously reported to have been charged by Noynoy to see to it that the SAF task force had everything they needed to accomplish their mission.

TALKS WITH REDS

Digong keeps talking about ending negotiations with the Communist Party of the Philippines, saying talks with the rebels were just a “waste of time”.

If he is serious, he ought to issue forthwith the order formally cancelling the talks and informing the rebels accordingly. 

Failure to do so might otherwise be misinterpreted by everyone as lack of decisiveness on his part.

BOC’S FAELDON

Customs chief Nicanor Faeldon has threatened to name members of Congress and other politicians who are alleged influence peddlers.

He will be doing himself and the Filipino people a favor if he did. It’s time we got rid of those vermin.

So, what is stopping him?

***

Today is the 102nd day of the eleventh year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper.

The family and friends of Jonas hope that the Duterte administration will exert serious efforts to find and haul the perpetrators of Jonas’ disappearance to justice.

***

From an internet friend:

Retirement has many secrets:


Q. How many days are there in a week?

A. 6 Saturdays, 1 Sunday

Q. When is a retiree’s bedtime?

A. Two hours after he falls asleep on the couch.

Q. Why don’t retirees mind being called Seniors?

A. The term comes with a 20 percent discount.

Q. Why do retirees count pennies?

A. They are the only ones who have the time.

Q. What does a retiree do all week?

A. Monday to Friday, nothing. Saturday and Sunday, he rests.

I enjoy waking up and not having to go to work. So I do it three or four times a day… Gene Perret

***

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