August 20, 2017, 4:23 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07443 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4017 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03628 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.32436 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02723 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03626 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04054 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63579 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03534 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00763 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.60377 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02797 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13904 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06579 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30624 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20692 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 405.75598 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04049 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02733 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 13.57175 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13799 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.59343 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.43535 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98075 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47231 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.59951 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13357 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95278 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19181 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.28109 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36583 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46433 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01797 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04244 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01572 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08685 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.91021 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 182.75233 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1491 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.14512 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15784 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47422 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13229 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24625 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.54195 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 269.57844 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07211 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30521 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.93595 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 657.62059 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9771 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.6139 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01433 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.23666 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0906 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.38113 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 81.57681 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 9.12404 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 18.24078 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.6366 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00614 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01662 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.364 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 166.08836 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 30.51277 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.08877 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 1.84435 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25922 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06179 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01258 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02821 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19642 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36735 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.09972 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.52331 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.27726 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16258 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.25578 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.70024 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31394 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.54094 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37863 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08672 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2604 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.52615 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59972 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17055 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08654 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02835 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00779 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06622 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06654 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11897 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0753 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 112.82935 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0738 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08196 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.14766 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.61897 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.076 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16004 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26836 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13498 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17451 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02797 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45006 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 152.00649 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.08634 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 435.85326 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17678 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.43737 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26014 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6897 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04917 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04647 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0711 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13537 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61011 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 45.17633 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53223 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.78071 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57377 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 77.82732 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20216 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 459.54601 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18241 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05201 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 11.77483 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05472 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 11.82205 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.13174 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 5.06546 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25921 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 105.17835 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.33482 Zimbabwe dollar

Fallacious

HE has yet to formally take up his position as ambassador, but already Jose Romualdez gives the impression he will be no different from his predecessors in Washington.

In a recent TV interview, Romualdez was quoted as saying that the Duterte administration’s independent foreign policy is not new but that it is more emphasized this time.

 “It’s a kind of policy that I think has always been around but it’s just more emphatic this time,” Romualdez said. 

Huh? I have been around long enough to know that what he said is so fallacious that it boggles the mind. 

Or is it just him? That being pro-US is equivalent to having an independent foreign policy? For that’s what we have been since the Republic was born in 1946 – being inordinately and unabashedly pro-US that, among other things, kept us out of the Non-Aligned Movement for a long time during the Cold War. We were looked down upon as a pariah in the developing world and nothing more than a US stooge.

So, pray tell, how could something that everyone knows had not been there be “more emphatic this time”?

And now, Romualdez says the US role in Southeast Asia is crucial. Everyone knows that. But it would be good for him to remember what his immediate boss, Foreign Secretary Alan Peter Cayetano said:

 “Do not pretend that you’re (US) protecting the Philippines. You’re protecting your interest.”

As I wrote last week, our diplomatic representation in Washington should absorb and digest what Cayetano succinctly defined as an independent foreign policy.

Romualdez, therefore, would be well-advised to bear that in mind and not be influenced by his previous and present close association with sundry firms, groups and personalities both here and in the US. His main concern should be the promotion and protection of Philippine interests – of the majority of Filipinos, not only of the elite and the pro-American sectors of our society.

PH-US RELATIONS

US Ambassador Sung Kim obviously has a keen understanding of how PH-US relations should be pursued – more focus on the ground with initiatives and programs for cooperation and making sure that their economic engagement remains strong.

Kim also said he was not surprised that the Philippines is seeking to improve its relations with China.

“The fact that the Philippines would want an improved relation with China is not surprising and does not, in any way, undermine our relationship with the Philippines. I think, in fact, all countries in the region would want to have smooth relations with China,” Kim said.

He likewise said he believes that the Philippines and any other country should pursue an independent foreign policy.

HUMAN RIGHTS

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson will reportedly raise as of this writing (August 6) US human rights concerns when he meets with Philippine officials over the weekend. 

I hope Tillerson does not raise the question and relate it to the campaign against illegal drugs of President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong. That would certainly raise the latter’s hackles once again over US interference in our domestic affairs.

In any case, the Department of Foreign Affairs said that the Philippine Government is keen on correcting Washington’s perception of Duterte’s war on drugs, based on “exaggerated” reports.

“We welcome the opportunity to address their concerns and correct the perceptions they may have gleaned from exaggerated media reports,” the DFA statement read.

EX-PRESIDENT AQUINO

I do not blame Digong at all for calling ex-president Noynoy Aquino stupid (gago) after the latter said nothing is happening in the former’s war against illegal drugs.

Surely, Noynoy knows that the horrifying drug problem we now have did not happen when Digong took over a year ago. It could have taken place only during his six-year watch. For instance, how many huge shabu factories, one of which was in his own turf (Tarlac), were discovered and shut down soon after Digong took over? They could not have been built overnight. 

In this regard, I think former Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa, Noynoy’s czar against criminal syndicates which no doubt include the drug cartels, should be requested to shed some light on the drug menace.

Perhaps Ochoa could also be requested to share what he knows about the Mamasapano Massacre. He was previously reported to have been charged by Noynoy to see to it that the SAF task force had everything they needed to accomplish their mission.

TALKS WITH REDS

Digong keeps talking about ending negotiations with the Communist Party of the Philippines, saying talks with the rebels were just a “waste of time”.

If he is serious, he ought to issue forthwith the order formally cancelling the talks and informing the rebels accordingly. 

Failure to do so might otherwise be misinterpreted by everyone as lack of decisiveness on his part.

BOC’S FAELDON

Customs chief Nicanor Faeldon has threatened to name members of Congress and other politicians who are alleged influence peddlers.

He will be doing himself and the Filipino people a favor if he did. It’s time we got rid of those vermin.

So, what is stopping him?

***

Today is the 102nd day of the eleventh year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper.

The family and friends of Jonas hope that the Duterte administration will exert serious efforts to find and haul the perpetrators of Jonas’ disappearance to justice.

***

From an internet friend:

Retirement has many secrets:


Q. How many days are there in a week?

A. 6 Saturdays, 1 Sunday

Q. When is a retiree’s bedtime?

A. Two hours after he falls asleep on the couch.

Q. Why don’t retirees mind being called Seniors?

A. The term comes with a 20 percent discount.

Q. Why do retirees count pennies?

A. They are the only ones who have the time.

Q. What does a retiree do all week?

A. Monday to Friday, nothing. Saturday and Sunday, he rests.

I enjoy waking up and not having to go to work. So I do it three or four times a day… Gene Perret

***

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