May 27, 2018, 2:31 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06987 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04394 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03405 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46707 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02507 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03386 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03804 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.58684 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03178 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00718 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.30759 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01902 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02521 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13049 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06941 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01902 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2997 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18862 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 380.82557 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.038 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02456 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01888 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.92087 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1215 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.23245 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.69241 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01902 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.79018 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41871 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.37645 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12092 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.9416 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20987 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25394 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33993 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51779 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01623 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03907 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01422 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01425 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08823 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89024 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 171.23835 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13955 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.93875 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14924 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45305 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11993 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23264 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.18261 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 268.49914 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06761 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28921 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.52235 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 800.64676 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00476 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.38368 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01348 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08195 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.91839 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2975 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 77.23036 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.96595 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.12003 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.46376 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00575 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0156 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.24805 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.41735 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.6285 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.00552 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.59102 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23569 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05799 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0118 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02586 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18008 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31929 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99391 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.77516 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.76412 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15373 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.73388 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65627 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29618 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.63553 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37196 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07566 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23683 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.82899 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59717 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15404 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06962 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02745 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00732 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01902 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0621 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06201 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19897 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06975 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 108.10348 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06924 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0751 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.17631 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.13468 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07134 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15092 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25547 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34155 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16566 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02546 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01422 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42241 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.32471 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.69051 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 397.78391 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16644 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.79608 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23678 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60662 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0483 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04363 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08961 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1286 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56886 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.27563 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49705 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.0291 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01902 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5933 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 151.83565 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1494.25528 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 433.30797 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03595 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04914 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.63667 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05136 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.63667 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.926 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.75366 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23681 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 98.716 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.88415 Zimbabwe dollar

Heart, like, sad, angry? Emoticons for issues

SOCIAL media platforms have paved the way for its users to register their thoughts on posts without actually saying anything by clicking on emoticons: thumbs up for likes, hearts, angry and shocked faces, and the like. Reacting to particular issues by simply tapping an option is yet another way to engage with your friends or those you follow (with less effort required than typing out a comment,) and the number of likes and shares are used by some to measure how engaged their audience is with the content that they post. If we were to use the same set of reactions on social media for this week’s issues, what would these reactions be?

Like. The IMF’s growth forecast for the Philippine economy remains good, and growth seems to be on track despite a weak peso and rising inflation. The work of past administrations have made the economy what it is today, as pointed out by Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez III. Out of the three things on Dominguez’s laundry list, I hope that poverty reduction receives the attention it deserves, with investments hopefully translating into jobs for Filipinos and not just for Chinese contractors. 

Sad. President Rodrigo Duterte has thumbed down signing the proposed divorce bill, saying that his daughter, Davao City Mayor Sara Duterte, is against it. While anyone is certainly entitled to his or her own opinion on the issue, the virtual shut down is disappointing because there was certainly no debate on the merits of the proposal; it was simply put forth as a matter of personal preference. While personal positions do play a role in how policy is crafted, it should not be the only consideration when it comes to issues that have a more far-reaching impact on the lives of 100 million Filipinos. 

Angry. With the April 26 deadline for the closure of Boracay looming, it’s maddening that there seems to be no cohesive plan to provide safety nets for the workers and businesses that will be affected. Friends who have visited the island recently have come back with stories of employees who are frustrated and genuinely concerned for their livelihood, given the lack of a master plan coming from government. Small businesses have taken to social media to ask for help for their employees, dispose of their inventory, and look for alternative opportunities for those in their employ. Adding fuel to the fire is the Tourism department’s idiotic suggestion of holding a future Miss Universe pageant on the island to drum up interest after the closure. This only supports the conclusion that Secretary Wanda Teo seems to have no other plan to promote tourism in this country beyond holding beauty pageants.

Love. Facebook is finally cracking down on fake news, by partnering with independent fact-checkers in different jurisdictions. I heard about this effort more than a year back, as Facebook had cast a net for organizations that could serve this particular purpose. The social media network is now actively blocking the sharing of posts that have been flagged by fact-checkers are false, and notifying users of such limitation. Some critics have branded the move as censorship, but as long as it is the initiative of Facebook itself, it falls under self-censorship, which is allowed, even in media. How little or big the move will contribute to fighting fake news remains to be seen in the coming months, but it is certainly appreciated by those who are sick and utterly tired of all the fake news being peddled by propagandists and paid trolls. 

Laugh. Social media users couldn’t make heads or tails of Ilocos Norte Governor Imee Marcos’ viral video, where she tries her hand at educating the audience at pronouncing Ilokano words, then trying to pronounce them with a French accent. Nobody knows exactly why she did this, except to try to ride on the same concept of tutorial videos on how to pronounce the names of designer brands. It was so comical in its execution that you couldn’t help but laugh; just not in a charitable way. It backfired massively, with users tweeting out suggestions for a second video, with words like “liberté, égalité, fraternité, voleur” or “thief.” Oh well. 

Wow. Senator Manny Pacquiao, incumbent senator and boxer extraordinaire, has severed ties with long-time trainer Freddie Roach, a few months before his scheduled fight against Lucas Matthysse. While splits in the boxing world aren’t uncommon, the Pacquiao-Roach break-up falls within the realm of douchebaggery (defined as “obnoxious or contemptible behavior” by Urban Dictionary) on Pacquiao’s part because it was done via press release. You’d think that ending a 15-year relationship would require more than just a phone call (which Pacquiao didn’t even do) but apparently this wasn’t a problem for the gentleman from Saranggani. 

Which issues engaged you this week, dear millennials and fillennials? Drop me a a line or leave a comment on Facebook!
Rating: 
Average: 3.8 (5 votes)

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