June 26, 2017, 1:18 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07443 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4017 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03628 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.32436 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02723 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03626 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04054 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63579 Bangladesh Taka
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1 Philippine Peso = 34.60377 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02797 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13904 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06579 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30624 Bhutan Ngultrum
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1 Philippine Peso = 405.75598 Belarus Ruble
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.02733 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 13.57175 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13799 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.59343 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.43535 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Cuban Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.95278 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19181 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.28109 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36583 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46433 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01797 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04244 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01572 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08685 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.91021 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 182.75233 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1491 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.14512 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15784 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47422 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13229 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24625 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.54195 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 269.57844 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07211 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30521 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.93595 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 657.62059 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9771 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.6139 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01433 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.23666 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0906 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.38113 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 81.57681 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 9.12404 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 18.24078 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.6366 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00614 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01662 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.364 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 166.08836 Lao Kip
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1 Philippine Peso = 3.08877 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 1.84435 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25922 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06179 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01258 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02821 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19642 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36735 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.09972 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.52331 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.27726 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16258 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.25578 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.70024 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31394 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.54094 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37863 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08672 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2604 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.52615 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59972 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17055 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08654 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02835 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00779 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06622 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06654 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11897 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0753 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 112.82935 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0738 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08196 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.14766 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.61897 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.076 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16004 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26836 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13498 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17451 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02797 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45006 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 152.00649 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.08634 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 435.85326 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17678 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.43737 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26014 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6897 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04917 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04647 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0711 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13537 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61011 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 45.17633 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53223 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.78071 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57377 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 77.82732 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20216 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 459.54601 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18241 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05201 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 11.77483 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05472 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 11.82205 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.13174 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 5.06546 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25921 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 105.17835 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.33482 Zimbabwe dollar

Jigsaw intelligence

IT seems that the military establishment is still run like a fat, plodding bureaucracy. 

Supreme Court Associate Justice Mariano del Castillo blames the “total failure of intelligence that practically caught the military by surprise” in Marawi. 

Solicitor-General Jose Calida could only say before the SC that intelligence-gathering was similar to a jigsaw puzzle and putting together classified information was not perfect. (Calida would never admit that Estelito Mendoza would have done a better job if he was contracted by Malacanang to help the Sol-Gen before the SC.) Well, Calida just painted a correct picture of bewilderment and puzzlement of top intelligence and security officials over the Marawi attack. When all they knew was that Isnilon Hapilon was in Marawi City and that the military had come to arrest him, indeed there is much to worry about the capacity of the intelligence units of the Armed Forces led by the NICA to cope with the complex manner of deployment, intelligence and recruitment of Islamic terror groups. 

President Duterte himself must have been fed with misleading information, or the lack of it, when he dismissed the Maute group as only a bunch of drug traffickers. And, repeatedly the military has downplayed as propaganda the claim of the little known Maute group and a faction of the Abu Sayaf pledging allegiance to ISIS. 

If there is any solid form of advanced technical and technological proficiency in intelligence gathering and analysis, it must have been lost somewhere in the web of administrative, financial, operational, acquisition, accountability and deployment sections and divisions, as well as in the layers of command, control and review, of the DND and NICA. Patronage acquisition and purchasing become apparent in really bad implementation which, of course, is very common with huge national projects, mainly because tons of money have gone to the “intended” wrong suppliers. Regrettably, Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana is not savvy enough to lead his department in protecting the nation against well-equipped, well-funded and extremely- intelligence-grounded terror groups.

It must be a cultural trait going back a long way imposed on subordinates to make their superiors look good. The corporate world is abuzz with toxic climates created by bosses dumping demands on employees and setting short deadlines. In the military, it spells tragedy.

Thirteen Marines gave up their lives and scores were wounded in the bloodiest one-day firefight of the Marawi siege. They had been pushed by their ground commanders to retake the remaining enemy positions. This was after the armchair generals had reportedly given orders for Marawi to be freed by June 12 to coincide with the nation’s celebration of its 119th year of independence. It was supposed to be a huge and sumptouos gift to the President already weary by the prolonged war and hungry for a victory. Marines spokesman Major Ryan Lacuesta told this columnist during the wake of the gallant 13 that the WestMinCom Chief was almost sure that the ground commanders would not let them down. Lacuesta said that he himself was confident the ground commanders would know what tactical operations to undertake against the enemy who were mostly entrenched in unknown positions.

Apparently, Duterte must have felt the guilty pangs of a Commander-In Chief who did not stand in the way of the AFP Chief and the regional commanders from proceeding that way.

Presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella was probably right in saying that Duterte did not order it, promptly distancing the Chief Executive from what many now regard as a major blunder.

A platoon of his “boys” led by 1st Lt. John Frederick Savellano proved to be more than the kind of men their commanders portrayed themselves to be. Their ultimate sacrifice was their countrymen’s victory that fateful day, which , indeed, all of us should relish as a tribute to them and the other soldiers who gave their lives in Marawi. Duterte had rushed to Villamor Air Base less than two hours after the plane bearing the coffins of the slain soldiers arrived last Saturday night. Forty-eight hours after coming face to face with the remains of the 13 marines and their grief-stricken families, he would cancel all his official appointments for the next three days .Duterte did not need that kind of hoopla from the generals who were out to show that symbols were mightier than life itself. They seemed convinced that Marawi City should be retaken completely by June 12 and that the rewards from the President would outweigh the tremendous costs.
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