January 22, 2018, 6:34 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07248 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.15117 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03513 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37432 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02466 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03513 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03947 Barbados Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Bermuda Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.13539 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06307 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25863 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19114 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 395.1056 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03943 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02465 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01899 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.98717 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12629 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 56.09039 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.14821 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78074 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.40983 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.49517 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12017 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94356 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24754 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25256 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34873 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.537 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01614 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03952 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01424 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08955 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95481 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.50149 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14478 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.06335 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15424 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4645 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11993 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2536 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.98796 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 262.6801 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06734 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2595 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.36688 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 722.49855 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02684 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.44306 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01395 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18305 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02388 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.36803 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.05665 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.11131 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.76199 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.05013 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00592 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01618 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.40616 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.40439 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.70989 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.03631 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.51372 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24018 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06017 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01225 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02645 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1822 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33221 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99072 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.54431 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.6416 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15887 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.94691 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64535 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3059 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.08092 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36718 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07768 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24178 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.06532 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6045 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15516 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01397 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02711 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00759 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06337 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06241 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17782 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06737 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 110.75588 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07183 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07523 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11021 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.49398 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07401 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15294 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26317 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13811 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15903 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02605 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43825 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 150.5822 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.09138 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 395.67793 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17269 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.16341 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24082 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62838 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04813 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04392 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07512 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1331 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57902 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.22736 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56937 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.46241 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56325 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 160.3513 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19686 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 447.97712 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03691 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0496 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.5818 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05329 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.49813 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92441 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.9329 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24034 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.41761 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.14229 Zimbabwe dollar

PET justice... biased?

AT THE Kapihan at Café Adriatico in Manila this week, we heard former Senator Ferdinand Marcos, Jr. decry the obvious bias of Supreme Court Associate Justice Benjamin Caguioa, the ponente of the Marcos election protest which is now pending before the Presidential Electoral Tribunal (PET).     

The series of decisions issued by the PET on Caguioa’s resolutions clearly demonstrated the bias of Caguioa against Marcos.

Marcos told the gathering of journalists at this weekly forum:   “It has become fairly obvious that [Justice Caguioa’s] resolutions are biased against me, and biased in favor of my oppositor...” referring to former Camarines Sur Rep. Leni Robledo.  

Caguioa was appointed by former President Benigno Aquino III.   Caguioa and former President Aquino were classmates from elementary to college at the Ateneo de Manila University.  

While the PET is a collegial body composed of 15 justices of the Supreme Court, it is Caguioa, who was assigned the case, who decides and issues the minute resolutions regarding the Marcos protest. Marcos then enumerated some of the orders issued by Caguioa which showed his one-sidedness in favor of Robredo. 

Right smack during Holy Week last year, April 2017, when all the banks and financial institutions were closed, Marcos learned that he had a few working days to pay his initial P36 million protest fee. Told that the Marcos protest would be dismissed if the P36 million were not paid within those days of the Holy Week, Marcos complied; paid the amount right on time.

Robredo, on the other hand, failed to pay the fee on the date mandated by the PET.   

Caguioa gave Robredo an unprecedented payment extension. “Robredo was ordered by PET to pay P7 million for her counter-protest.  Robredo failed to comply.”  

Despite this failure, Robredo was allowed an extension, when according to the PET law, the Robredo counter-protest should have been dismissed for non-payment on time.  She failed to pay. 

Further, Robredo was allowed to defer her payment, despite the law that failure to pay on time will result in the dismissal of Robredo’s counter-protest.  

To this day - nine months later - Robredo still has not managed to fully complete the payment of her deposit.  Her counter-protest has not been dismissed, despite the PET law that mandates dismissal.

Another manifestation of Caguioa’s lopsided decision was Marcos’s motion concerning the decryption and printing of ballot images in the SD cards.   This was originally opposed by Robredo’s camp.

Caguioa’s motion: Marcos has got to pay - P7 million - for the decryption costs. Paid for all the costs, Caguioa has not given the Marcos camp the printed images - which have been ready since last year.  Meanwhile, Justice Caguioa promptly released to the Robredo camp the copies of the ballot images, without so much as requiring her to pay the cost.

 “Humingi kami ng mga ballot images doon sa mga SD cards, pinagbayad kami ng P7 million. Pero nag-object ‘yung kabila.  Said we should not have those ballot images.  To move on, we paid P7 million para sa papel, para sa toner, para sa tao, etc. Tapos noong ginagawa na ‘yung ballot images, the camp of Leni Robredo, who had objected to the printing of the ballot images, was given a soft copy, na hindi babayaran. 

“Basta ibibigay na lang sa kanya ng libre ‘yung copies ng binayaran ko ng P7 million. Justice Caguioa granted it. So Robredo, meron siyang copy pero ako, who paid for it, hanggang ngayon naghihintay pa ng aming kopya,” Marcos lamented.

Another instance was when Caguioa ordered Marcos to produce 8,000 witnesses for his third cause of action (annulment of votes in the provinces of Lanao del Sur, Maguindanao and Basilan) within a non-extendable period of five days.  After his legal team complied and submitted the names of 8,000 witnesses within the non-extendable five-day period, Caguioa merely deferred the resolution of his motion.

 “We produced 8,000 witnesses within five days.  Nagpuyat kami just to comply with his Order.  Pero ano’ng ginawa? Imbes na i-take up, they deferred, because siguro they hoped that kung hindi kami maka-come up ng 8,000 witnesses, idi-dismiss na lang.   Pero nakapag-produce kami kaya hindi nila ma-dismiss,” Marcos said.

Marcos:  “Itong patuloy na ganito,  hindi na tama ito. I do not feel that we are getting justice in the Presidential Electoral Tribunal thus far with these decisions of Justice Caguioa.  Masyado nang obvious. We tried to give him a chance. I have great respect for the justices. We always give them the benefit of the doubt. Even if we don’t agree with the PET decisions, we still comply, but the Rules do not seem to apply to the other side.”

Marcos added that after one and a half years, it is clear that the strategy of his opponent is to delay his protest in the hope that he would lose hope and throw in the towel.  But their attempts to delay the protest come with a price:  the current political instability of the country. 

“It has been almost two years and we have not yet done a recount, not even a single ballot box has been retrieved.  How can you say that it is correct for an issue as fundamental or basic as to the conduct of national elections to be kept hanging. The questions are still up in the air.

Ang mga issues not decided; two years.  Ano’ng mangyayari sa atin?  Ang tao hindi nakakasiguro kung sino talaga ang nanalo. Magdadalawang taon na. All these questions are left unanswered and it cannot be good for the stability of our political system.”

Marcos found it strange that Romeo Macalintal, lead counsel of his opponent, kept issuing unsolicited advice that he should run for a Senate position in 2019 and forego his election protest. “Why?  I was already elected vice president.  If they have nothing to hide, they should do everything in their power to let the recount begin.  What are they afraid of?”

***

Dahliaspillera@yahoo.com
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