January 19, 2018, 4:04 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07263 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.14992 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03521 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37318 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02474 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03521 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03956 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63687 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03163 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00745 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.63172 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01978 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02627 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13568 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06382 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01978 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25445 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19324 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 395.96518 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03951 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02456 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01896 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.96895 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12736 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 56.62579 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.15506 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01978 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77275 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.40883 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.49743 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1197 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95886 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24462 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25141 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34978 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53817 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01607 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03956 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01433 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01431 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08957 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.9371 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.94699 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14509 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.07219 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15475 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46509 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11922 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25771 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.9644 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 263.35047 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06775 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.266 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.41772 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 723.08147 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02255 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.43928 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01399 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18216 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03224 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.37189 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.26622 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.12896 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.80063 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.02452 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00594 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01622 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.47765 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.7856 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.88528 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.04292 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.5093 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24248 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0603 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01227 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02646 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18183 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33356 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98418 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.46361 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.8837 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1593 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.96203 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64676 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30795 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.11195 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37086 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07803 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24161 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.0807 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6072 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15518 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0265 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02715 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0076 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01978 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06341 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0624 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18473 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06706 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 110.52215 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07202 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07488 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11739 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.52987 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07417 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15387 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26503 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13841 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15847 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02609 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01433 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4392 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 150.90981 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.85839 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 393.89636 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17306 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.18552 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24175 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.63054 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04769 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04409 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07507 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13281 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5839 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.34335 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56547 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.79588 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01978 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56468 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 160.81883 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19729 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 449.14952 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0449 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04966 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.5352 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0534 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.5352 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.90645 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.94363 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24183 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.64043 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.15783 Zimbabwe dollar

That photo shoot

AS I was about to send this piece to my editor to meet my deadline, I happened to read in a morning daily that President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong said the photo-shoot of his granddaughter in Malacanang was a “small matter”.
“It’s a small matter. Gamitin lang ang Malacañang. Wala naman ako doon and even if I was there, eh, kung granddaughter ko magpa-picture, lahat nga ng mga bisita dyan nagpapa-picture eh,” he said.
Well, it is not a “small matter” to me because it runs counter to what Digong has been saying and portraying himself to be – a poor probinsiyano whom the majority of the people supports because he identifies with them. He shuns ostentation and has unequivocally expressed his disdain for the ways of the rich and famous, the privileged class, the oligarchs.
I have, therefore, decided to go ahead with the piece below with slight editorial changes. So, please read on, dear readers…
What I write below is no reflection at all on my continuing ardent and wholehearted support for the policies of Digong on both major domestic and foreign affairs, particularly on his pursuit of an independent foreign policy, the campaigns against illegal drugs and corruption and his drive to uplift the lives of the poor.
Presidential spokesman Harry Roque said there was “nothing wrong” with the pre-debut photo shoot of Digong’s granddaughter Isabelle in Malacañang, that no law was violated, that the Duterte family could be living in the palace but chose not to.
Granted. But what Roque (and Digong) failed to appreciate is the fact that people from different sectors, including a good number of Duterte supporters, criticized the photo shoot of the comely presidential granddaughter from an entirely different perspective.
Digong was elected by the less-privileged, the unwashed, the downtrodden because he identifies with them. He knows and appreciates their problems and continues to address them as well as he could. He has shown disdain for the ways of the privileged class. 
He chose not to live in Malacañang not because he is afraid of ghosts, as he claims. He simply doesn’t want to live in such an opulent surroundings. He’d rather continue to dwell in his ordinary house in Davao City and sleep under his “kulambo”.
With that background in view, the image and the impression that the people got from the photo-shoot is that of a presidential granddaughter who loves opulence, the ways of the rich and famous, what with all those beautiful and presumably very expensive finery. She was also attended to by a couturier and a make-up artist.
This is the same winsome lass whose taste for expensive clothes, bags and shoes have been written about.
A friend said: “But she’s a girl, a teenager soon to be a debutante. Every girl loves and dreams of having and doing those things.”
True, but she could have been advised by (her grandfather) and her parents to be more discreet about such things, much less flaunt them, in deference to her grandfather.
Her parents may well be able to afford such things. But it runs counter to what her grandfather, the President, has tried desperately to portray himself to be and which endeared him to his people – the simple and poor probinsiyano whose aim in life is to serve the Filipino people, lift the the majority of them out of their miserable existence and provide a more secure future for them and their children.
His outright dismissal of the commissioners of the Presidential Commission for the Urban Poor for not doing their job is a prime example of how he feels towards the poor.
I could be wrong, but I do not think Digong was consulted on the photo-shoot beforehand or that if he was, that he would have assented to it. (It would appear I am wrong.)

THE DENGVAXIA MESS
Digong wants French company Sanofi Pasteur, makers of the anti-dengue vaccine Dengvaxia, to refund to the government P3.5 billion for concealing the possible adverse effect of the vaccine.
This will put Sanofi in a bind if it is true that kickbacks had been paid to certain individuals in the purchase of the vaccine. The company may either 1) pay the entire P3.5 billion first and later collect what they may have given the bribe takers unless, of course, they’d rather charge that to experience; or 2) if the latter refuse to return the money they got, reveal their names publicly so they can be prosecuted accordingly.
Either way, we win. Of course, we also lose by way of the 830,000 Filipinos who have already been given the vaccine, not to mention those who have died because of it.
In the meantime, spokesman Roque said Digong will be waiting for the results of the Senate and Department of Justice investigations on the anomaly so he could “run after all individuals who may have criminal culpability for this”.
This, the people await with bated breath.

CANADIAN WASTE
Canada has issued a travel advisory to her nationals of “a serious risk of terrorist attacks and kidnappings” in Mindanao following the extension of martial law till the end of next year. Fair enough.
However, Canada should have also advised her nationals, for health reasons, to avoid going anywhere near where the garbage and toxic waste sent to us nearly four years ago are rotting and reeking with the foulest of smell.
*** 
QUESTION: Why is there zero endorsement in the House of Representatives for the impeachment complaint filed against Ombudsman Conchita Morales?
ANSWER: Because many still have pending cases in the Ombudsman Office???
***
REMINDERS
I have decided to resume inclusion of this Reminders segment in this space to remind the administration of its yet unfulfilled promises and matters that need attention and/or follow-up action.
1) Digong’s promise to rid the country of foreign troops. This, of course, includes re-visiting the VFA and the EDCA with the US.
2) Reciprocal visa arrangements with the US and other countries.
3) The retrieval of the Balangiga bells.
4) The return of the Canadian waste.
5) The immediate implementation of the FOI. 
***
Today is the 229th day of the eleventh year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper.
After the acquittal of Major Harry Baliaga, Jr., the only person formally charged with Jonas’ kidnapping, I guess what happens next is now up to Divine Providence.
***
From an internet friend: 
Some words of advice and comfort for all you ladies out there:
1) Don’t imagine you can change a man – unless he’s in diapers.
2) Go for younger men. You might as well – they never mature anyway.
3) Best way to get a man to do something – suggest he is too old for it.
4) Men are all the same – they just have different faces, so you can tell them apart.
5) If you want a committed man, look in a mental hospital.
6) If he asks what sort of books you’re interested in, tell him checkbooks.
7) Love is blind, but marriage is a real eye-opener. 
***
A Merry Christmas and a Happy and Prosperous New Year to one and all! 
***
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