November 25, 2017, 1:41 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07254 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.22066 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03521 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34299 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02592 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03516 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03951 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.60589 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03253 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00746 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.51185 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02656 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13552 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06373 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27914 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20568 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 395.49586 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03947 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0251 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01934 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.5162 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13038 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.75346 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.09502 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.82714 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42146 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.5079 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12329 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94607 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.26118 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25918 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34868 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53457 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01656 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04139 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01481 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01481 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.09104 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92967 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.69657 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1449 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.07922 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15426 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46501 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12517 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.22145 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.16041 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 266.6535 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0693 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27625 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.03437 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 696.06876 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03813 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.47234 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01397 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20192 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03576 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.37669 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.67207 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.28586 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.77953 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.38305 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00596 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0162 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.52213 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 164.26314 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.7906 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.03635 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.46247 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27292 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06023 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01226 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02699 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18541 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34526 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.01442 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.92612 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.20229 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15888 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.91426 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.68451 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30047 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.14757 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36633 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0813 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27483 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.03279 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60352 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16042 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04563 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02867 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0076 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06392 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06337 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07685 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0697 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.98933 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07516 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07679 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.15428 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.47807 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07408 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15686 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26162 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13157 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16365 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02658 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01482 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43868 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 150.13829 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.00356 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 406.44806 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17286 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.17345 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27485 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6448 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04877 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04522 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07781 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13097 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5918 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.15251 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53121 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.55275 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57349 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 159.22561 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19705 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 448.93324 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09581 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05077 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.85875 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05334 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.88937 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.96543 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.93678 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27485 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.51877 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.14935 Zimbabwe dollar

Red meat and cancer

WE have discussed this red meat-cancer link in this column a few years back, but recent studies have sparked new interest on this medical controversy, and confirmed fundamental findings which might be of interest to you. After all, everyone wants to be as healthy as possible and live as long as our telomeres would maximally allow.

What are telomeres?
Telomeres are the protective caps at each end of our DNA. They shorten with age and could also be affected by good or bad lifestyle. Avoiding bad habits and bad diet (living a healthy lifestyle) will slower its shortening, therefore, maximizing life span. There are now on the market DNA tests that will track cellular age (telo-years) based on telomere length, for $129 per test.

But why test for the amount of “poison” in our system and spend that amount for a test when the better way is to stop taking in known “poisons” and simply live a healthy lifestyle thru exercise, diet, abstinence from tobacco, moderation in alcohol intake, and stress management with RRR (regular rest and relaxation). 

As far as diet is concerned, red meat is on the spotlight again.

What’s with red meat?
Red meat (beef, pork, veal, lamb, mutton, goat, and other mammalian muscles), fresh or processed, are both suspected to increase the risk for cancer and other major illnesses. The processed ones are deemed worse. Some of the processed red meats are sausages, bacon, ham, patties, hamburgers, bologna, corned beef, salami, pepperoni, pastrami, most deli-meats, and canned meats.

How much red meat is consumed in the USA?
In the United States last year, it is estimated that one person consumed about 106.6 pounds of red meat. Over the years, the consumption of red meat has gone down from 145.8 pounds per individual in 1970 to almost 40 pounds less today. The past ten years alone saw the red meat eaten has gone down about 10 pounds per person. The lowest on record was in 2014, at just 101.7 per person. Indeed, red meat intake has dramatically fallen the past four decades because of widespread news of colorectal cancer and other forms of malignant tumors, and their link to consumption of red meat.

Why are so many eating less red meat?
Besides being more expensive than white meat and plant-based food items, the damaged reputation of red meat as being unhealthy for us and its link to increased cancer risk, and the warning being on the internet and all social media today, people around the world are becoming more educated and health conscious. Their desire to live healthier and longer is encouraging them to stay away from red meat and instead eat fish, legumes (the various types of beans and garbanzos) and/or chicken as sources of protein. For breakfast, many have switched to the old fashioned oat meal and some fruits, instead of high carb foods (like rice, bread, pancakes, waffles, soft drinks (liquid candy), etc.) and processed foods which are also high in saturated fat (bacon, sausage, ham.) 

Is red meat really that bad?
The World Health organization in October 2015 highlighted in a report that “when it comes to red meat intake, cancer is perhaps the most well-established health implication.” It concluded that red meat is “probably carcinogenic to humans,” meaning that there is some evidence that it can increase the risk of cancer, a cancer-causing agent. It has been found that those who eat a lot of vegetables, legumes, fish daily (instead of red meats) are healthier and less prone to cancer. The Cancer Council recommends no more than 455 g of red meat a week, if any at all. Many abstain from red meat and opt for fish, vegetables, legumes, which are protective against many forms of cancer, like colorectal, stomach, breast, prostate, and pancreatic cancers

What are processed meats?
The World Health Organization defined processed meat as “meat that has been transformed through salting, curing, fermentation, smoking, or other processes to enhance flavor or improve preservation,” and as such is “carcinogenic to humans.” There is sufficient evidence today that processed meat intake increases cancer risk. 

What in red meat is cancer-causing?
Studies have shown that two groups of toxic agents (cancer-causing), Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclice aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are formed when muscle meat (beef, pork, poultry and fish) is cooked at high temperature, like pan frying or grilling directly over an open flame. HCAs and PAHs are known to damage DNA and suspected to increase the risk for cancer formation. The World Health Organization says ”that each 50-gram portion of processed meat - which primarily includes pork or beef - consumed daily increases the risk of colorectal cancer by 18 percent.” The burned (charcoal black) portions of fried or grilled meats are toxic.

How did WHO come to that conclusion?
The WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) reviewed more than 800 independent studies analyzing the effects of red meat and processed meats on the different types of cancers. The evidence uncovered reveled that those who ate red meat had increased risk for colorectal, pancreatic and prostate cancer. There are ongoing studies about the role of HCAs and PAHs in human cancer risk.

Why the shift to plant-based foods?
There are approximately 8 million adults in the United States who are vegetarians or vegans for animal welfare, the 2016 Harris Polls reported. But there are millions more who are switching from red meat to plant-based diet because it is healthful. A position paper from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in December 2016 suggested that “a plant-based diet can lower the risk of type 2 diabetes by 62 percent, as well as reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke.” Actually, what entice people is not only the health benefits of consuming plant-based foods but the significant link of eating red meat and cancer.

What are the options?
As we grow older, health becomes more significant and a priority. The adage “Health is Wealth” is most valid and true. Just ask those millionaires or billionaires who are going blind from a disease with no cure, or who are dying from cancer, or losing their mind from Alzheimer’s. They would give up their material wealth in an instant just to regain their health. 

We have options. Since we do not know if our genes (DNA) can tolerate and survive regular red meat consumption without developing cancer and major cardiovascular illnesses, it behooves us to enjoy a diet of fish, vegetables, legumes, and nuts daily and stay away from, or significantly reduce, our red meat intake, in view of the scientific evidence before us. Or, we can continue our red meat diet and accept the consequences of killer diseases and of premature death. Like anything in life, it is a matter of choice.

***

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