July 17, 2018, 5:32 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06864 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00897 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03439 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.50824 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02516 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03326 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03738 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.56345 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03139 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00707 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.72248 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1282 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07195 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.282 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19138 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 374.13568 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03734 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02459 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.14969 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12502 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 53.37133 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.54401 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.76603 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4139 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.31714 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11919 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92375 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19884 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25015 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3334 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51037 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01599 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03902 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01411 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01412 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08949 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.88526 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 168.36105 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13998 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.87012 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14665 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44715 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11858 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25939 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.1596 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 268.604 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06791 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27993 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.12671 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 807.13885 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0015 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.42478 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01324 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09923 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.87722 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27646 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.63072 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.88806 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.81929 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.08952 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00566 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01532 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.39993 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.01738 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.13493 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97982 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97197 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24762 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05697 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0116 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02562 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17688 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31088 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98075 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.55578 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.74846 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15104 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.63427 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6382 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29097 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.33283 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35287 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07569 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24767 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.69034 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58456 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15155 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04691 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02764 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00719 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06103 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06077 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.27135 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06898 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.5969 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06802 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07424 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1686 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.92992 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07008 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14699 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25089 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33555 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16567 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02551 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01412 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41499 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 153.24238 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.65221 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 391.8333 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16352 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.624 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24803 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62213 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04953 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04334 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.09042 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12621 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57118 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.3846 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.48981 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.93085 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58568 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 145.44945 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 2236.96505 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 430.74192 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06036 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04858 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.48103 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05046 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.48103 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.90563 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.66922 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24782 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 96.98187 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.76322 Zimbabwe dollar

Safe toys...

ECOWASTE Coalition names 10 Hazardous Toys not to buy this year. EcoWaste Coalition, a non-profit watch group promoting children’s health and safety, released a list of toys that may put a child at risk of physical injuries and chemical exposure.

 “Children are uniquely susceptible to the negative effects of shoddily made and chemically laden toys as their immature bodies and minds are still growing and developing, It is the responsibility of toy manufacturers, distributors and vendors, and even individual toy givers, to offer toys that meet quality and safety standards in recognition of the right of children to safe games and toys to play with,” reminded Thony Dizon, Chemical Safety Campaigner, EcoWaste Coalition. 

 “While all children are vulnerable to injuries and chemical exposures, children from families living in poverty may be at increased risk due to their lack of purchasing power and their lack of access to product safety information, justice and redress,” he added.

In a bid to keep unsafe toys out of children’s hands, the EcoWaste Coalition has come up with a list of hazardous toys (haztoys) that are often sold without the required market authorization from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

“Through this list, we hope to hammer home the need for consumer awareness and vigilance against unsafe toys this Christmas season,” Dizon said. “It is not an exhaustive list of toys in the market that may present various health and safety hazards to innocent children,” he clarified.

Among those that landed on the EcoWaste Coalition’s list of 10 “haztoys” are baby rattles, fidget spinners, a xylophone, doll figures, a “Shrilling Chicken,” duck bath toys, toy artificial nails, a Rubik’s Cube-like toy, a toy car, and battle swords. 

1. Baby Rattles. Sold very cheaply for as low as P15, rattles come in various types and sizes and are often sold without choking hazard warnings in violation of R.A. 10620, or the Toy and Game Safety Labeling Act. Rattles can break and release the small beads, bearings or balls inside, posing a choking hazard to helpless babies. 

2. Fidget Spinners. Also called hand spinners, these popular toys contain bearings and bushings that many come off and get ingested by children. Aside from its small parts that may detach and its pointed edges that may cause cuts or lacerations, the EcoWaste Coalition found a “Ninja Animation” hand spinner adorned with a yellow paint containing dangerous lead concentrations amounting to 125,100 parts per million (ppm), way above the 90 ppm limit. Lead, a toxic metal, can wreak havoc on the developing brain, leading to reduced intelligence. 

3. “Wonderful Music Xylophone.” While lead was not detected on the other coated metal bars of this musical instrument, the orange bar was found to contain 10,800 ppm total lead, in violation of the 90 ppm limit under the DENR’s Chemical Control Order for Lead and Lead Compounds.

4: Doll Figures. Cadmium, a carcinogenic chemical, was detected on the paint coatings of these unlabeled dolls at 1,200 ppm. Like lead, cadmium can disrupt the development of a child’s brain, causing learning disabilities.

5. Shrilling Chicken. This “screaming” chicken toy may contain banned substances such as di(2- ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCPPs). A laboratory analysis contracted by the EcoWaste Coalition found a sample of Shrilling Chicken laden with 19.1% DEHP, exceeding the 0.1% limit. Luxembourg banned Shrilling Chicken in 2017, Spain in 2016, and the Czech Republic in 2014 due to its DEHP content. Sweden banned it in 2013 for containing highly toxic SCPPs.

6. Floating DuckBath Toy. Supposedly a fun companion for babies during bath time, this toy may contain DEHP. A laboratory test commissioned by the EcoWaste Coalition found a vinyl rubber duck laced with 18.87% DEHP, way above the 0.1% limit.

7. Toy Fashion Nail Set. The adhesive used to attach these artificial nails contains Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP), which is listed among the substances that must not form part of cosmetic products under the Asean Cosmetic Directive. According to a health warning by the FDA, “DBP has the ability to cause allergic reactions, (which) can induce a state of hypersensitivity in the immune system.”

8. Dian Sheng Eatena Puzzle Cube. This Rubik’s Cube-like toy tested positive for toxic flame retardant chemicals OctaBDE and DecaBDE, which are commonly found in the plastic casings of cathode ray tube TVs and computer monitors. Based on tests conducted at the Czech Republic in 2015, this China-made toy purchased in the Philippines contains 108 ppm of OctaBDE and 293 ppm of DecaBDE, which are chemicals known to disrupt human hormone systems, affecting the brain and the central nervous system. 

9. Police Cool SUV. Sold on the sidewalk for P20, this plastic toy car contains 1,380 ppm of bromine, an indicator that the material may contain polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) from recycled e-waste plastics. PBDEs are targeted for global elimination under the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants.

10. Battle Swords. These toy weapons measuring 25 to 30 inches long have the potential to cause blunt force injuries to the eyes, face and body due to the plastic blade, especially when played without adult supervision.

We hope consumers will heed Eco-Waste’s call for toy safety. All children deserve nothing less than safe toys that are well-designed, durable, age-appropriate, and non toxic.

***

Dahliaspillera@yahoo.com
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