February 21, 2018, 10:39 pm
Facebook iconTwitter iconYouTube iconGoogle+ icon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07045 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04297 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03415 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38059 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02443 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03415 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03837 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59409 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0304 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.58872 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02533 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13159 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06235 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2325 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18295 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 384.03989 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03832 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02429 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.018 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.42605 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12152 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.88202 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.87186 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.71801 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39493 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.3921 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11601 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94226 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17652 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24369 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33858 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52177 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01557 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03825 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01371 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01377 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08533 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89967 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.74122 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14073 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.9296 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15011 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45024 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11584 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.216 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.85824 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 261.23153 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06714 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24329 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.71245 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 713.12103 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9248 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.40936 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01359 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0619 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9413 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.3061 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 77.09572 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.62709 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.26453 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.55496 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00575 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.12565 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.52676 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.96605 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97621 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45904 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22463 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05848 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0119 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17647 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31853 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95396 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.47477 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.90946 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15451 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.71398 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62536 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29868 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.76098 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35911 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07494 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22327 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.88663 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59477 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15035 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98703 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02611 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00738 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06229 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0629 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11989 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06472 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.82716 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06982 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07256 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.0862 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.12737 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07193 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14866 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2582 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34501 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15536 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02534 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01372 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42597 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.36485 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.78074 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 381.75523 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16785 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.87876 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22325 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60368 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04586 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0428 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07262 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12717 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.55966 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.06541 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51746 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.67197 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54556 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 156.62766 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 478.3426 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 435.71839 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98465 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04817 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.20986 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05179 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.20986 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.85248 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.79474 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22325 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.5492 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.94226 Zimbabwe dollar

SC Resolution favors Bongbong

MGA Manananggol Laban. Laban kanino? A newly formed group to end EJK. Some are anxious to get Laban’s laconic, untroubled definition of EJK; which ever extra judicial killings Laban has its sights on; and the names of those EJK’s victims and killers. 

Law freshman Horatio Castillo III, dead after his UST Aegis Juris fraternity brods were done hazing him. Since Atio is a victim of extra judicial killing--killed without the sanction of judges and courts--shouldn’t Mga Manananggol Laban jump in and work to find the extra judicial killers of Atio? 

Antonio La Viña who’s been on media microphones lately, Edre Olalia, Erin Tanada, Marita Wasan, Armin Luistro, Rene Saguisag, Pacifico Agabin, Neri Colmenares, Jose Manuel Diokno, Ernesto Maceda Jr, June Ambrosio, Roberto Cadiz, Rachel Pastores and the rest of the Laban group--have any of them done anything to bring justice to this extra judicial killing of Horatio Castillo III? We are waiting for you to let us know what all, if any, you have done to help ferret the elusive killers of Atio Castillo. 

Laban can also help the authorities with unsolved non-drug EJK--dead for any of the following reasons: 1) enemies, 2) love triangles, i 3) drug competitors, 4) intrigues, 5) inheritance, 6) scorned, 7) addict’s unpaid debts, 8) jealousy, 9) envy, 10) drunk, 11) infidelity, 12) joy killing, 13) creditors/debtors, 14) politics, 15) burglary, 16) parricide, 17) resisting arrests, 18) drug-addled, 19) business competitor, 20) do-good vigilantes.
President Duterte’s spokesman, Harry Roque, the human rights lawyer, denied that there had been human rights violations on the part of the President. But Roque welcomes Mga Manananggol Laban. Sa ano? 

Roque: “Unless we can come up with actual evidence that there are extra-legal killings, then we cannot overcome the presumption of regularity in the discharge of official functions.... [President Duterte] he will not tolerate murders. He will only tolerate killings when it is in line with duty and when the engagement is legal.”

Roque said in any war it is expected that... “Unfortunately, there will be collateral damage.... The goal of the government is to minimize the collateral damage. The goal of the government is to uphold the right to life which is to protect and promote the right to life. As far as this obligation is concerned, there is a continuing obligation of the state to investigate, prosecute and punish the perpetrators of these killings.... I welcome the creation of that group of lawyers because we need the help of civil society in overcoming the presumption of regularity in the discharge of functions.”

Supt. Vemily Madrid, PNP deputy spokesman: “Let me make it clear, there is no such order to kill drug suspects. So, how much more giving cash rewards to those police officers who were able to kill drug suspects.”

Lingayen-Dagupan auxiliary bishop Jose Elmer Mangalinao tells us that the “Stop the Killing Appeal” is led by Archbishop Socrates Villegas, outgoing president of CBCP. It includes the ringing of church bells for 15 minutes each 8 p.m, rural bedtime. It was done to remind the faithful that life is sacred and no one has the right to take life away or kill.... Mangalinao is repeating what is common knowledge, but not the solution. The problem still with no solution is that the authorities have no idea who the EJK murderers are. There are many dead. But missing are the killers: 1) enemy? 2) love triangle, 3) drug competitors, 4) intrigues, 5) inheritance, 6) scorned, 7) addict’s unpaid debts, 8) jealousy, 9) envy, 10) drunk, 11) infidelity, 12) joy killing, 13) creditors/debtors, 14) politics, 15) burglary, 16) parricide, 17) resisting arrests, 18) drug-addled, 19) business competitor, 20) do-good vigilantes. Do Mangalinao and Villegas have an idea where to find these killers? 

***

The camp of former Senator Ferdinand “Bongbong” R. Marcos Jr. expressed tribute to a resolution of Supreme Court, sitting as the Presidential Electoral Tribunal (PET). 

The Comelec had asked the PET to order Marcos to pay Php 4.5 million for New York and Hong Kong storage fees. The PET rejected Comelec’s motion, saying it had no basis and that they should shoulder the storage and other incidental fees. 

It was Comelec who chose not to return the ballot boxes and other election materials to the Comelec headquarters in Manila. There was no objection from either PET or Marcos to return those to the Comelec headquarters in Manila. Comelec could have done so by securing the PET’s permission.

Precautionary Protective Order (PPO) directs Comelec to preserve and safeguard the integrity of the ballots and other election materials. But Comelec failed to bring ballots and materials back to the Comelec office in Manila within the required period. The ballots and materials therefore had to be stocked in the foreign posts which resulted in P4.5 million fee for New York and Hongkong.

“... Indeed, the Comelec could have simply secured permission from the Tribunal for their transfer to the Comelec Central Office. The Comelec made no such request... (a)s mentioned, the PPO is clear in that the Comelec and its agents were ordered to preserve and safeguard the integrity of the election materials and paraphernalia which could be done, even if they needed to be transmitted to Comelec Central Office.”--Statement from the Precautionary Protective Order.

PET: “Protestant never requested that the election materials and paraphernalia be physically retained in the custody of the Posts. Rather, it was the Comelec that made the decision not to instruct the Posts to transmit the election materials and paraphernalia to the Comelec Central Office, despite the absence of any prohibition for the same. Had the Comelec made such instruction, the Subject Expenses would not have been incurred. Accordingly, the Comelec must bear the responsibility of paying for the Subject Expenses incurred by the Posts.”

Lawyer Victor Rodriguez, spokesman of Marcos, praised the PET for the ruling, saying that it was a positive development in the midst of unabashed moves to derail the proceedings, by making it more cumbersome for Marcos. “This is certainly a very positive development for Senator Marcos. As you can see, our opponents are making things more difficult for us by trying to delay the case; making us pay left and right without any basis. We are glad that the PET denied these unfounded and unnecessary moves, so our case can finally move forward.”

***

Dahliaspillera@yahoo.com
Rating: 
Average: 1.8 (5 votes)

Column of the Day

Light in the darkest hour

By BERNARD KARGANILLA | February 22,2018
‘Sic semper tyrannis.’

Opinion of the Day

Self-induced cancer

By Philip Chua | February 22, 2018
‘At least 250 Filipinos die each day from smoking-related illnesses, cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic diseases, and cancers, especially lung cancers.’