February 22, 2018, 3:26 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07045 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04297 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03415 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38059 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02443 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03415 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03837 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59409 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0304 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.58872 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02533 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13159 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06235 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2325 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18295 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 384.03989 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03832 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02429 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.018 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.42605 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12152 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.88202 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.87186 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.71801 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39493 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.3921 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11601 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94226 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17652 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24369 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33858 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52177 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01557 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03825 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01371 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01377 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08533 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89967 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.74122 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14073 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.9296 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15011 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45024 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11584 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.216 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.85824 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 261.23153 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06714 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24329 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.71245 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 713.12103 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9248 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.40936 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01359 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0619 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9413 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.3061 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 77.09572 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.62709 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.26453 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.55496 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00575 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.12565 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.52676 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.96605 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97621 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45904 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22463 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05848 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0119 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17647 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31853 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95396 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.47477 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.90946 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15451 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.71398 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62536 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29868 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.76098 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35911 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07494 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22327 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.88663 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59477 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15035 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98703 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02611 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00738 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06229 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0629 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11989 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06472 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.82716 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06982 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07256 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.0862 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.12737 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07193 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14866 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2582 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34501 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15536 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02534 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01372 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42597 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.36485 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.78074 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 381.75523 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16785 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.87876 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22325 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60368 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04586 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0428 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07262 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12717 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.55966 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.06541 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51746 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.67197 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54556 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 156.62766 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 478.3426 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 435.71839 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98465 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04817 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.20986 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05179 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.20986 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.85248 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.79474 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22325 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.5492 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.94226 Zimbabwe dollar

Selling the Philippines

ACCORDING to the Philippine Statistics Authority, tourism contributed 8.6% to the total gross domestic product in 2016, roughly amounting to P1.234 billion. It has risen steadily since 2011, where it started at 6.8% and ended at 8.6% in 2015. Employment in tourism characteristic industries has also been enjoying an uptick, with 2016 figures estimated to be at around 5.2 million, accounting for 12.8% of the total employment in the country.

With these figures, it’s no wonder that selling the Philippines as a viable tourist destination is imperative to growing an economy. And this task falls not only on the Department of Tourism but also on other departments that have jurisdiction over factors that affect a tourist’s overall experience when they visit: peace and order, access to health facilities, transportation, and easy access to tourist spots and facilities. Whether we like it or not, citizens also play a substantial role in attracting tourists to the country; in the same way that we rely on foreign friends to give us recommendations and tips when it comes to visiting their home countries, tourists are more encouraged to visit when they see the enthusiasm of their Filipino friends about their homeland. 

Conversely, it is we the people who suffer, both directly and indirectly, when our country gets a bad rap internationally. Sure, the occasional side eye you get from your foreign friends and colleagues over unbelievable or bad news from home can’t exactly be categorized as suffering, but certainly, losing a job because the tourism industry is taking a hit certainly will hurt. 

The Department of Tourism knows this well, which is why it was quick to throw its new partner agency under the proverbial bus after its new TVC “Sights” was found to be distressingly similar to an existing campaign all the way from South Africa. DOT is already smarting from the travel advisories issued by the United States, the United Kingdom and other countries due to security-related issues such as the presence of the Abu Sayaff Group in Bohol and the declaration of martial law in Mindanao. Add to that the recent incident over at Resorts World, and you have a perfect storm of sorts for the folks over at DOT, who must all be tearing their hair out over convincing tourists to visit in such a state of affairs. 

Soon after its launch, netizens where quick to point out that its tagline, “Experience Philippines,” had already been used in other campaigns, most notably by India’s “Experience Bengal” campaign. Enterprising citizens were also quick to draw comparisons scene by scene of “Sights” to the South African TVC, which both contain an interesting twist: the storyteller is seen from the view point of a blind person. Both seek to sell an intangible: that warm, fuzzy feeling you get from visiting a place that makes you feel right at home, despite being thousands of miles away. 

Now, for the bad part. DOT’s quick and public severing of its relationship with McCann Worldwide, the agency that executed the TVC, is certain to give pause to reputable agencies out there who may be thinking of offering its services to help government. To begin with, government’s procurement process is like going through the eye of a needle. It is painful, slow, and filled with bureaucratic twists and turns unfathomable to those in the private sector. Getting paid is also an issue when it comes to dealing with government. I haven’t seen the contract that DOT signed with McCann, but for their sake, I hope it contains a clause for progress or partial payments for any work performed. 

The procurement process is a common complaint among businessmen, and the recent fallout from this incident won’t help move that observation in the right direction. Those more familiar with the creative and production processes in the advertising industry would know that McCann is not entirely to blame for the blow-up, considering that a client is involved in every step of the way, beginning from the approval of the creative brief to approving the final launch of the campaign. DOT’s statement on the issue certainly puts the blame entirely on McCann, with matching veiled threats about pursuing accountability. 

They would have us believe that one of the biggest advertising outfits in the country went rogue on the project. Either this is true or that whoever was in charge over at DOT completely neglected their duty in implementing a P650 million contract. You’d think that the new blood at DOT would have been mindful of past copycat issues raised against previous campaigns, but their behavior reveals that it had no impact whatsoever in terms of doing their due diligence for the project. Sure, while we can’t expect the DOT team to be aware of each and every tourism campaign launched all over the world, diligence dictates that they must have, at the very least, instructed the McCann team to do a check after they had signed off on the concept, even before the production of the TVC. 

I am hoping against hope that this incident doesn’t discourage other brilliant talent to work with government. Because if that happens, it is ultimately the Filipino people that will be getting the short end of the stick (again) when all that government will be left to work with are those who are after the pay check, backed by mediocre or worse, shady talent.

But it’s not all bad, thankfully. People have stepped up to the plate, with crowdsourced material sprouting from every corner of the internet, most notably the one from @CreativesofMNL on Twitter and Nas Daily on Facebook. If DOT team does not get its act together, I’m betting Filipinos will again take it upon themselves to contribute in their own ways to keep visitors coming. That despite all the chaos that is happening, we Filipinos love to laugh, love to eat, and that we love to show visitors why we all still love the Philippines, warts and all.
Rating: 
Average: 4.5 (2 votes)

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