February 20, 2018, 9:57 pm
Facebook iconTwitter iconYouTube iconGoogle+ icon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07035 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03736 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0341 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37852 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02417 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0341 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03831 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.58755 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03006 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00722 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.54368 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01916 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02532 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13142 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06189 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01916 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.22893 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18046 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 383.5249 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03827 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02404 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01774 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.3659 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12153 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.27203 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.83966 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01916 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.70268 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39128 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.38755 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.115 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93544 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.16856 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24138 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33716 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52165 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01543 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03813 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01366 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01366 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08656 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89866 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.37548 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14054 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.9364 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14982 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45019 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11447 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.21437 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.80326 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 259.67432 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06787 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23063 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.68199 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 709.84673 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.91667 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.39444 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01355 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03307 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.93774 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30544 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.53257 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.57567 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.24138 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.41552 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00573 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01571 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.12088 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.62069 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.83908 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97165 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.44272 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22308 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0584 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01189 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02534 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17539 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31734 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.9454 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.42146 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.82375 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15425 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.68582 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61303 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29828 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.66743 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35467 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07454 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22274 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.87739 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59195 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14901 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 1.96697 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02593 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00737 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01916 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06225 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06025 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11398 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0642 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.68774 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06973 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07198 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.08044 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.10153 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07184 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14875 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25546 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34393 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15255 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02511 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01367 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4254 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.16858 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.76628 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 378.35439 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16762 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.86552 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22276 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59923 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04546 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04238 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07167 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12904 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.55669 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.02682 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51715 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.38697 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01916 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54521 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 156.47509 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 477.73945 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 434.75095 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01916 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04802 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.11303 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05172 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.11303 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.81628 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.78831 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22279 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.41571 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.93295 Zimbabwe dollar

UN resolution on Myanmar

THE Philippines voted against a draft UN General Assembly resolution calling on Myanmar to end military operations against the Rohingya Muslims. It also calls for “full and unhindered humanitarian aid access and for Myanmar to grant full citizenship rights to the Rohingya”. 
The draft resolution will be debated in a plenary meeting of the General Assembly next month for a final decision. 
However, our Permanent Representat77ive to the UN in New York, Teodoro Locsin, Jr., said the Philippines should have abstained instead. He said he was in Manila for the Asean
 Summit when the voting took place in the Third Committee. 
His staff hadn’t briefed him on what was happening in the Third Committee before he left New York? Did he make his recommendation for abstention to the Home Office or instruct his deputy to do so at the appropriate time, but was overruled? No matter. That’s water under the bridge.
 “It will be different when it goes to plenary. I will push for abstention. It is the right thing…,” Locsin said.
Now, that’s a different story. 
Leaving aside the pros and the cons of a “no” vote or an “abstention”, it is my considered view that changing our vote 
in plenary to “abstention” may not be the “right thing” to do – that is, if the Department supports Locsin.
First off, it will definitely give the impression that there is dissension in the ranks and that our left hand doesn’t know what the right hand is doing. That won’t be good for obvious reasons.
More importantly, it will make others wonder where the Duterte administration actually stands on UN interference in the domestic affairs of member states which is prohibited by the UN Charter.

THE FOREIGN
SERVICE ACT 

Can a president override provisions of a Republic Act passed by Congress?
I ask this because of the recent appointment of former presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella as an undersecretary in the Department of Foreign Affairs.
Section 6 of Republic Act 7157, known as the Philippine Foreign Service Act of 1991 states:
 “SEC. 6. Undersecretaries.—Upon recommendation of the Secretary, the President shall appoint three (3) undersecretaries to advise and assist the Secretary in the formulation and implementation of the Department objectives and policies, and to coordinate and oversee the operational activities of the Department of Foreign Affairs.” 
Abella is now the sixth undersecretary in the Department! 
Does the above provision mean that the Secretary can recommend the appointment of more than three undersecretaries? If so, did Secretary Alan Cayetano do so?

DOTr USEC CHAVEZ 

Department of Transportation Undersecretary Cesar Chavez irrevocably resigned over the recurring MRT glitches.
In his resignation letter, Chavez said “simple sense of delicadeza” gave him no choice but to resign.
 “I hope the President understands that in the light of recent events involving the MRT3 System, simple sense of delicadeza which I have adhered to throughout my professional life gives me no choice but to resign from my said position,” he said.
Transportation Secretary Arthur Tugade said he was “surprised” at Chavez’ resignation. 
Was he surprised at Chavez’s sense of delicadeza too?

ROQUE’S MRT RIDE

Presidential spokesman Harry Roque said his ride in the MRT and LRT was “not that bad”. 
Natcherly, he took the ride not during rush hour; he didn’t have to queue up; but above all, there were no glitches like decoupling of the train, air-conditioning breakdown, sudden opening of doors, broken rail, sudden loss of power, etc., etc., etc. 
Some comments of commuters:
 “Nakakaabala”; “daming security at alalay”; “may hatak pang media”; “trabaho ba ng spokesman ‘yan?”; “stunt in aid of election?”; “naranasan kaya ni Mr. Roque ang makipagtulakan, mahipuan, o kaya e makaramdam ng takot tulad ng nararamdaman ng ordinaryong commuters tuwing sasakay ng tren? Kung hindi, his MRT experience is sooo kulang. Balik!! Dapat rush hour ha! 
At the end of his ride, Roque was quoted as saying that what was needed was “more MRT coaches and good maintenance service providers.” 
Huh?! Obvious ba? Everybody knows that!!!

NEW SENATE OFFICE 

Fourteen (14) senators voted to build a “world class” and “iconic” new home in Taguig City by 2020, according to Senator Panfilo Lacson, chair of the Senate accounts committee.
Are the honorable senators who voted for the resolution so uncomfortable in their present offices that they feel the need to move? 
I think their sense of timing sucks! 
For starters, P90 billion is needed for the rehabilitation of Marawi city and its inhabitants. That alone, surely, requires greater priority over the Senate’s move, considering the government’s meager resources.
If at all a new government building has to be constructed, it should be that “ghost-infested” presidential palace (?) by the stinking Pasig River. 
The official residence of the head of state or government, aside from the national emblem, is a national symbol of a country. It is, therefore, fitting and proper that it is one that the Filipino people could be proud of. 
Needless to say, any incumbent resident should be one too!

MAGUINDANAO
MASSACRE

Eight long years and nothing has happened so far in the trial of those accused of perpetrating one of the worst crimes in recent memory – the Maguindanao Massacre of 58 people, 32 of them journalists.
And if the proposal of Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez for the abolition of the Court of Appeals does not prosper, will the crow turn white before those guilty are made to pay for their grievous sin?
President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong has vowed to help the victims’ relatives for an early conviction of the guilty ones.
Let’s watch what happens.

KIDS IN THE SENATE

Kids “took over” the Senate in celebration of World Children’s Day 2017 last week.
For an hour, they expressed their concerns and called on legislators and policymakers to attend to the issues directly affecting them.
I wouldn’t have minded at all if they took over the Senate permanently. Not one of them, I’m sure, has any insidious agenda.
*** 
Today is the 208th day of the eleventh year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper.
After the acquittal of Major Harry Baliaga, Jr., the only person formally charged with Jonas’ kidnapping, I guess what happens next is now up to Divine Providence.
***
From an internet friend:
A 72-year old man had one hobby - he loved to fish. 
He was sitting in his boat the other day when he heard a voice say, “Pick me up.” 
He looked around and couldn’t see anyone. He thought he was dreaming when he heard the voice say again, “Pick me up.” 
He looked in the water and there, floating on the top, was a frog. The man said, “Are you talking to me?” 
The frog said, “Yes, I’m talking to you. Pick me up, then kiss me and I’ll turn into the most beautiful woman you have ever seen. I’ll make sure that all your friends are envious and jealous, because I will be your bride!” 
The man looked at the frog for a short time, reached over, picked it up carefully and placed it in his shirt pocket. 
The frog said, “What, are you, nuts? Didn’t you hear what I said?” I said, “Kiss me and I will be your beautiful bride.” 
He opened his pocket, looked at the frog and said, “Nah. At my age, I’d rather have a talking frog.”
*** 
https://www.facebook.com/reynaldo.arcilla.9847
Rating: 
Average: 5 (1 vote)

Column of the Day

8 UST Aegis Juris brods out!

By DAHLI ASPILLERA | February 21,2018
‘Educational institution managers are finally cognizant of the practice of pagan cult man’s inhumanity to man in their campuses: fraternity initiation killings.’

Opinion of the Day

The cats of BGC

By ABIGAIL VALTE | February 20, 2018
‘If we can’t find it in ourselves to have a little compassion for defenseless animals, how can we find it in ourselves to care for fellow humans?’