September 19, 2017, 7:45 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07179 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17553 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03474 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33168 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02434 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03495 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03909 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57584 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03196 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00736 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.8794 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01955 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02626 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13468 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06076 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01955 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25293 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19814 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 391.32134 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03905 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02381 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.19703 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12797 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 56.56763 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.20407 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01955 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.80414 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42683 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.47146 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12175 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92005 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.16386 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25592 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3448 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45563 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01636 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0398 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0144 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01438 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08637 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87373 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 174.19859 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14252 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.99648 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15278 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45582 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12205 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.20133 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.05786 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 258.65911 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06872 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25233 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.81079 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 654.02658 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07584 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.54613 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01384 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17369 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00743 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.34064 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.2025 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.08053 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.59187 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.0045 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00588 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01603 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.62568 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 161.53245 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.42533 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98769 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.27717 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25762 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05959 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01213 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02655 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18266 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34275 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.00176 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.48554 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.84988 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15735 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.05629 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65031 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30336 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.99922 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34428 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08176 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25704 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.88038 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5933 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15326 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99961 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02667 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00752 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01955 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06351 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06226 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05629 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06996 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 110.44762 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07117 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07527 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.12619 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.18804 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0733 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15296 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26388 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13018 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15555 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02627 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0144 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43405 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.59891 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.88741 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 400.87765 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17103 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.06607 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25709 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64621 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04766 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04368 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06714 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13149 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58751 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.66693 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51173 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.19156 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01955 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56626 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 157.93589 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19498 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 444.15559 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06353 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04908 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.72635 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05278 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62119 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9398 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.88468 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25718 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 101.43667 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.07389 Zimbabwe dollar

AWS HACKDAY; When hacking works to create solutions

It is not called a Hack Day for nothing. And Amazon Web Services (AWS)—a company whose mindset is firmly planted on constant innovation and creating opportunities for doing things differently—does this most ubiquitous of digital activities, in a most inventive way. 

Since its launch in March of 2006, AWS jumped from a Simple Storage Service to creating and deploying over 90 cloud services and counting, it’s grown into a very large, very successful platform used by everyone from casual individuals to large-scale companies. Amazon’s foray into the cloud has helped democratize development, giving everyone the same access to the host of tools they need to build robust web services at reasonable costs.

As part of this celebration of innovation, AWS hosted HackDay, one of its many hackathons, at their Asia Pacific headquarters in downtown Singapore on April 10, the day before the AWS Singapore Summit.

The event had 22 competing teams: 14 from companies (both small and large), 2 all-girl communities (The Data Girls & Coding Girls), 2 polytechnics (Republic Polytechnic & Singapore Polytechnic), 2 universities (The National University of Singapore & Nanyang University), and even a mother from Czechoslovakia.

As in any hackathon it was ideation to prototyping—creating technology solutions for real world problems, and using the versatile AWS platform to run the prototypes. 

The contestants were given an Intel Edison chip attached to a Groove Prototyping board to work with—the Groove board contained sensors and servos that could be controlled via the cloud through AWS. They were also each given an Amazon Echo unit for the voice and text-to-speech functions, a webcam, and an AWS IoT button, which functions much like Amazon’s Dash button. 

They were also given use of the AWS cloud services arsenal, with a particular focus on several key features including AWS Lambda, which is a compute service that lets users run their code and synchronize it with the rest of the other AWS services; Amazon Lex, which is a chatbot service used to build conversational interfaces that can be integrated with AWS’s other services and Amazon Polly , a text-to-speech service that can use custom pronunciation data and speak in accents, which can also used in conjunction with AWS interfaces; and Amazon Rekognition, an amazing image recognition service.

All of these, according to Alex Smith, Head of Media and Entertainment Architecture for AWS in Singapore, are to help reduce the complexity of the interfaces and makes them easier and more natural for users to interact with. And the ability of all of these services to communicate with each other and work together is what sets the AWS ecosystem apart. 

This HackDay began even before the 10th, as a week prior on March 29th, they were given a webinar to orient them to AWS’s services, and then on April 3 they had a pre-HackDay, where they were assisted in setting up their hardware. On the day itself, proceedings began at 8:30AM with a kickoff briefing, and then the hacking commenced. By 2:00PM, as members of the media were given an AWS and HackDay briefing and an IoT demonstration by both Mr. Smith and Olivier Klein (AWS’s Emerging Technologies Solution Architect for Southeast Asia), the contestants were still busy coding. And after nearly 12 hours of work, they then moved on to the presentations at around 8:30PM. Each team would demo their work in front of a panel of judges. 

“Everybody has a different way to put applications together,” said Mr. Smith of AWS, likening it to building legos. There is no prescribed way to put the bricks together, you simply pick and match what you need. This is the kind of thinking they were looking for in the winners, who were judged based on these criteria: How innovative their idea was, Its marketability and usefulness, how effective they were at utilizing AWS services, as well as user friendliness and the user experience. 

And what they came up with was truly innovative—these diverse groups of people all had equally diverse ideas for implementation: everything from indoor air quality sensors, medical services and devices to help patients with dementia, jogging planning assistants, to smart doorbells and home solutions for housewives.

Winnng ideas ranged from developing a smart doorbell service to a face recognition app, using IoT and Amazon Rekognition, to help dementia patients to agricultural robots.

There were two categories of winners: from the student group, and from the main group, and prizes included Kindle Fire tablets, AWS IoT buttons, and some AWS gift cards. 

For the student group, the team “4 Musketeers” bagged the prize, for their visual assistance device that translated medical information and reminded patients to take their medicines. In the main category, second place went to the group representing Singtel, who made an intelligent doorbell with facial recognition capabilities. And the grand prize winners were “DareDevils”, an Indian group who created an IoT solution to help farmers with their daily tasks.

According to them, they saw the hardships that farmers were facing and wanted to help ease the burden of their daily lives through automation and the cloud. Using their tech, farmers could control the watering and monitoring of their crops through a mobile app, making it more convenient to go about their chores without having to spend so much time and effort.

And this is AWS ultimate goal of HackDay—to both spur and showcase novel ideas that, if implemented, can further help bring about innovation and development, all through the cloud.
 
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UN meddling

By REY O. ARCILLA | September 19,2017
‘I believe it is time we raised before the UN Economic and Social Council the unwarranted interference by the UN in our domestic affairs.’

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‘Martial law was imposed to solidify the hold of the Marcoses on absolute political power.’