July 23, 2018, 9:36 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06891 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99812 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03452 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51726 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0334 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03752 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57017 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03144 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00709 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.85141 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01876 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02546 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12871 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07076 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01876 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.29362 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19433 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 375.60976 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03748 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02466 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01861 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.39231 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12694 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 53.79925 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56379 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01876 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.76454 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41373 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33021 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11925 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92946 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.2063 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2502 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3349 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51238 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01599 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03929 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01427 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0143 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08965 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.8925 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.1182 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14047 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.89268 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14725 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44908 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11833 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26435 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.20544 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 271.57598 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06798 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28997 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.32645 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 817.63602 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99062 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.44371 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01329 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09036 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.88462 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27979 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.96623 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.86454 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.88555 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.13321 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01538 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.50019 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.69231 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.24578 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.99906 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.82176 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25122 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0572 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01164 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02582 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17712 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31191 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98124 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.07317 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.94747 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15166 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.66041 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64259 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29212 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.38537 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35681 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07617 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25131 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.73546 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58799 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1534 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06473 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02754 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00721 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01876 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06142 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06111 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.40338 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06911 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 107.46904 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06831 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07438 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1907 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.006 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07036 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14815 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25182 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33678 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16626 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02554 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01428 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41662 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 157.41088 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.69418 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 392.12008 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16417 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.66191 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25104 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62495 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04951 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0442 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0899 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12621 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57388 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.58912 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49568 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.09381 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01876 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58555 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 145.53471 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 2245.77861 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 432.49531 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06942 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04922 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.49099 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05066 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.49099 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.90938 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.68762 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25122 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.36398 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.78987 Zimbabwe dollar

CBs reluctant to move, leave taps open

LONDON- The global recovery has powered through into the new year, bringing with it expectations for tighter monetary policy, something that tends to be followed eventually by recession -- and last time round, financial and economic shock.

Major central banks such as the US Federal Reserve, the Bank of England and the Bank of Canada have already raised interest rates, while the European Central Bank is moving ever closer to unwinding its own ultra-easy monetary policy.

So far, those banks have been reluctant to move rapidly, instead leaving the monetary taps open to try to drive up stubbornly low inflation and maintain growth.

“The danger is that we end up stoking bubbles which ultimately have even more disastrous long-term consequences,” said Peter Dixon at Commerzbank.

But if they tighten policy too soon -- or too fast -- they risk choking off the synchronized global upturn that has delighted policymakers, politicians, and vast swathes of jobless people who have finally got back into work.

If the current US economic expansion, already 102 months long, lasts another two years as many expect, it will be the longest in more than 150 years. 

Already-solid US growth will be lifted this year by tax cuts, something most economists polled by Reuters say is not warranted at this late stage of the business cycle. 

But it’s not just the US economy that is steaming ahead. Dozens of countries are now enjoying economic growth well above their 10-year moving averages.

HSBC economists noted in a recent report that periods in which the majority of countries are expanding at above their long-run trends tend to be associated with heightened monetary and financial risks.

“Synchronized global growth has tended to occur during only three stages in each economic cycle: in the initial recovery from recession; the years immediately preceding the next recession; or ahead of some sort of financial trauma,” they said.

While some individual forecasters have racked up impressive track records for accuracy, economists as a group consistently fail to predict recessions.

In a late-January survey, they said the global economy would expand 3.7 percent this year and 3.6 percent in 2019, faster than they expected in October. 

“Global growth has been accelerating since 2016 and all signs point to a continuous strengthening of that growth, in 2018 and next year,” the IMF’s Managing Director, Christine Lagarde, told a news conference at January’s World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos. 

Meanwhile, stock markets across the world repeatedly set record highs in 2017 but have had a turbulent start to the year.

“It’s hard not to see recent market turmoil as a taste of what’s to come as we enter a world in which central-bank support for asset prices can no longer be taken for granted,” Alliance Bernstein economists told clients.

Some 23 percent of investors believe the biggest tail risk for markets is a policy mistake by the Federal Reserve or ECB, according to a December survey by Bank of America-Merrill Lynch. 

The Fed is almost certain now to raise rates three times in 2018, in line with the central bank’s own projections, a Reuters poll found, even though some US policymakers are still worried about weak wage inflation and overall price pressures.

The risks are increasing that it will deliver four hikes.

Polls also found that Britain’s Bank of England will increase borrowing costs in May, earlier than previously thought, and while it will be a long wait before the ECB raises interest rates, it is expected to end its asset purchases by the end of the year. 

Those predictions for tightening come despite persistently below-target inflation. Policymakers say those price pressures will come and that robust growth rates can withstand tighter policy.

Yet who can forget the ECB raising borrowing costs in July 2008, just before the biggest financial crisis in recent memory and as European growth was already at a near-standstill, only to be forced into slashing rates months later.

It flip-flopped again in 2011.

The world is different now to how it was then, however, said Commerzbank’s Dixon, with many of the imbalances and problems that afflicted economies resolved.

“The fact is, you can’t continue to run economies on this kind of ultra-expansionary monetary policy forever. You have to take away the punch bowl now in order to prevent a bigger hangover later,” he said. – Reuters 
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