February 22, 2018, 3:24 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07045 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04297 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03415 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38059 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02443 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03415 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03837 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59409 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0304 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.58872 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02533 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13159 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06235 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2325 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18295 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 384.03989 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03832 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02429 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.018 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.42605 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12152 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.88202 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.87186 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.71801 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39493 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.3921 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11601 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94226 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17652 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24369 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33858 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52177 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01557 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03825 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01371 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01377 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08533 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89967 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.74122 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14073 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.9296 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15011 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45024 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11584 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.216 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.85824 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 261.23153 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06714 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24329 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.71245 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 713.12103 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9248 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.40936 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01359 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0619 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9413 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.3061 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 77.09572 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.62709 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.26453 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.55496 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00575 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.12565 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.52676 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.96605 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97621 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45904 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22463 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05848 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0119 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17647 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31853 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95396 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.47477 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.90946 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15451 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.71398 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62536 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29868 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.76098 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35911 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07494 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22327 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.88663 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59477 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15035 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98703 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02611 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00738 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06229 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0629 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11989 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06472 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.82716 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06982 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07256 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.0862 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.12737 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07193 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14866 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2582 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34501 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15536 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02534 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01372 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42597 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.36485 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.78074 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 381.75523 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16785 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.87876 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22325 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60368 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04586 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0428 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07262 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12717 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.55966 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.06541 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51746 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.67197 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54556 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 156.62766 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 478.3426 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 435.71839 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98465 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04817 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.20986 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05179 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.20986 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.85248 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.79474 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22325 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.5492 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.94226 Zimbabwe dollar

Despite cybercrime law, troll victims are helpless

by Raymond G.B. Tribdino

CYBERTROLLS and bullies are a plentiful but cowardly lot. 

e news, circulate shams in Tweets andposts and resort to mostly ad hominem attacks, in attempt to divert attention from the real issues, political or otherwise. 

To argumentum ad hominem or abuse of the person or personal attacks is added a new dimension—attacking those around or loved by the person—in an attempt to divert attention in an argument.  This has to do with many acts including name calling (example, “Dilawans” or “Dutertards”), refutation by caricature (“Trillianes is a coward who lost the coup).”

Attacking the person making the argument or persons close or connected to that person, rather than the argument itself, is completely irrelevant to the argument but seems to create an atmosphere of victory for the attacker.

Social media offers a platform where these cowards put up a brave face because they are protected either by distance (the most rabid protectors of the rampant rubouts and assassination of known criminals come from countries like the United Kingdom and the Middle East) or by layers and layers of profiles which can be easily set up by automated bots in places like China or Serbia. But trolling-as-a-service can be hired in places as close as Sampaloc, Manila.

Bib M., a mother of five and a staunch advocate of personal freedom and good governance was attacked recently by an army of trolls who took a really deep dive. The trolls bullied her for a comment about President Duterte’s management style, which she did not agree to. Her post was straightforward and forceful but was written with no malice.

The result? Not only was her Twitter feed and Facebook page overflowing with the worst kind of intelligible and trashy comments, someone involved her child into the scenario. Bib cried foul and reported for the accounts of the attackers to be blocked.
Multi-awarded journalist Ed Lingao chose to take a stand on radio commentator Erwin Tulfo’s rant against Senator Risa Hontiveros.

Unlike the posturing of trolls and the troll leaders, Lingao’s comments simply pointed out violations of the Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster ng Pilipinas (KBP) code of ethics and Tulfo’s insults aimed at Senator Hontiveros for allegedly expressing support for the Maute terrorist group. Tulfo’s tirade focused on a photo that appeared on Facebook, which turned out to be fake.

Lingao pointed this out, while commenting point by point on a 38-minute video rant made by his TV5 colleague against him. But what pains Ed more is how trolls have taken to personal attacks, involving his innocent daughter who just recently passed away. 

Camille regularly posts about human rights amidst the “tokhang” killings and shares material from Jim Paredes. A student blogger, she is also a Greenpeace volunteer and 


a human rights advocate. One day, her Twitter feeds and Facebook page was full of malicious attacks against her person, calling her a slut for being a single mother of two children sired by two men. To add to the pain, netizens attacked her “ugly children.”

In the U.S., Curt Schilling, a former major league pitcher, announced over Twitter his daughter’s plans to play college softball. The 17-year-old girl suddenly became the target of horrifyingly vulgar comments. Actual threats of sexual violence against found its way into the feeds. All these attacks inspired Schilling to condemn the “cyberbullies” on his blog “38 Pitches.”

Personal, ad hominem attacks are done because there is no other form of response from the attacker. If the correct logic of a post (or an argument) exceeds the 

capability of the attacker to comprehend and form a reasonable argument, retaliation comes in the form of a verbally abusive attack.

Parker Settecase writing a column called “Fighting Fallacies” in the blog Parker’s Pensées, writes, “of all the fallacies tossed around today, the abusive ad hominem is the most malevolent.”

“The abusive ad hominem fallacy..isa fallacy of relevance. The phrase itself is Latin for “to the man” or “against the person”. This fallacy is deployed as a personal attack against an opponent in order to draw attention away from their argument. It fits nicely under the category “fallacy of relevance” because the attack on the person is irrelevant (when it’s irrelevant) to the person’s argument,” Settcase says.

In all the examples above, the cybertrolls went about bullying the persons involved through their loved ones, cheered on by their followers who throw fuel into the fallacy by reposting their nonsense or repeating nefarious messages over and over again.

Bullying and its cyber counterpart comes only from an imagined superiority—that of say numbers of followers willing to engage in an unending word fight shielded by multiple Twitter or Facebook profiles—or even by bots that do nothing but replicate text phrases fed to it through thousands of fake accounts. 

In civil society people can argue about everything, without resorting to immature, personal attacks. Politics, in particular is a field that must be open to debate and criticism.

On the lighter side, people talk about telenovelas and Koreanovelas, the antagonists they hate and the protagonists they love. The level of discussion can be fun, sometimes shallow, but are considered opportunities to learn. Conducting healthy debate challenges conventions, questions our assumptions. 

Oftentimes a good argument will create change—in thinking and in action. And even there is nochange of mind or shift in thought, explaining to another person or group of people is both a good mental exercise and emotional outlet.

But sadly over the Internet, there is a dearth of good arguments. And since good arguments are hard to come by in the real world, they are almost impossible to be found on the Internet. Instead attackers—many of them educated people, students, professors as well as fascist followers—resort to violent words and act upon the helpless and the helplessness of family members dragged into the already invalid argument for no other reason than to create a diversion.

And once the massive number of organic and fake attackers join in the fray, the poor victim has no choice but to retreat or keep quiet. Keeping quiet is considered a win by the trolls.

“Oh walana siyang masagot, sigurototoo,” is a common point of contention.

Are there remedies for the this extreme form of cyberbullying?
Facebook and Twitter have taken positive steps to control if not eliminate cyberbullies.

Facebook has the Bullying Prevention Hub to find solutions to these problems while Twitter has proactively created ways to engage users reporting these accounts—including monitoring accounts considered to be repetitive in these actions.

Twitter has solutions from expanded notification, muting content, “Twitter time-out,” greater transparency on reporting, collapsing abusive Tweets, ensuring safer search content, and stopping the creation of abusive accounts.

Brutal attacks from cybertrollsmay not see an end in sight now. But artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies are now being employed to seek and remove cybertrolls. the very technology that allows cybertrolls to exist, will be the very technology that will end them.
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