November 25, 2017, 1:23 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07254 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.22066 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03521 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34299 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02592 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03516 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03951 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.60589 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03253 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00746 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.51185 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02656 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13552 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06373 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27914 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20568 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 395.49586 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03947 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0251 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01934 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.5162 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13038 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.75346 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.09502 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.82714 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42146 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.5079 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12329 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94607 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.26118 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25918 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34868 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53457 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01656 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04139 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01481 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01481 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.09104 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92967 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.69657 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1449 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.07922 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15426 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46501 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12517 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.22145 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.16041 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 266.6535 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0693 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27625 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.03437 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 696.06876 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03813 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.47234 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01397 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20192 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03576 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.37669 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.67207 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.28586 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.77953 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.38305 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00596 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0162 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.52213 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 164.26314 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.7906 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.03635 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.46247 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27292 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06023 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01226 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02699 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18541 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34526 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.01442 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.92612 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.20229 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15888 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.91426 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.68451 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30047 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.14757 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36633 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0813 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27483 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.03279 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60352 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16042 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04563 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02867 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0076 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06392 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06337 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07685 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0697 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.98933 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07516 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07679 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.15428 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.47807 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07408 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15686 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26162 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13157 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16365 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02658 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01482 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43868 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 150.13829 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.00356 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 406.44806 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17286 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.17345 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27485 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6448 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04877 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04522 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07781 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13097 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5918 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.15251 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53121 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.55275 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57349 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 159.22561 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19705 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 448.93324 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09581 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05077 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.85875 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05334 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.88937 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.96543 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.93678 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27485 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.51877 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.14935 Zimbabwe dollar

Local BPO gets Australian SMEs online

BY Desmond Gregory 


HAMMERJACK is an Australian business process outsourcing (BPO) company that set up shop in the country in 2015. It saw an opportunity in the hardworking, English speaking Filipinos but also because it offered something unique. Instead of simplyseat-leasing arrangements (operators on desk being co-managed by their clients) Hammerjack is the first to offer fully managed services to Australian SMEs.

“We offer small and medium business in Australia two things: digital transformation and enterprise-grade managed services,” says Andrew Mault, Hammerjack’s country manager and a Philippine BPO veteran who oversees operations from the company’s Makati offices. 

Hammerjack’s business concept is based on the idea that even the smallest companies, regardless of the industry they’re in, can benefit greatly from enterprise-grade tools and processes. To lead to digital transformation, it believes that leveraging of new digital technology to become more agile, secure, responsive, and efficient in day-to-day operations is the key.

So now the company provides outsourced services, to businesses from small bookkeeping companies and car garages, to mid-size accounting firms, larger wholesalers, and chain gyms.

To do the BPO’s day-to-day business, the company depends heavily on Microsoft products. 

“We help Australian businesses have better products, services, and processes through digital tools from Microsoft. And we provide a fully managed serviceat lower cost, allowing them to focus on their core business.”

This is something that Hammerjack has improved on with the help of Microsoft Teams, the new chat-based workplace that comes with the Office 365 suite. Since its beta release, Teams – with its enterprise-level security, threaded chats, real-time file-editing, and full integration with other Office 365 applications – has become a central part of the company’s day-to-day collaborative workflow.

Teams has made internal collaboration a lot easier. It allows us to quickly call up a team for, say, a new proposal, update shared files in real time, and to see that prompt action is being taken on our to-do’s. It’s also allowed us to do away with about 50 percent of internal e-mail.
People tend to respond differently to e-mail, and now that it’s all about Teams internally, our work is at once more efficient, seamless, convenient, and better organized,” Roy Figueroa, site director of the Makati office, points out.

“The way it integrates with other Microsoft tools makes Teams almost like a one-stop shop. You can log minutes of meetings; post comments; set to-do lists and checklists according to our internal teams, and even ‘like’ messages and use emojis. All this makes Teams a very good project management application, even if it’s designed as a collaboration tool first of all,” Mitch Yano, a process transitions lead comments.

This ease of collaboration may be the key for other outsourced service providers to successfully sell to Australian SMEs, and deliver promised outcomes. Making sure these results – whether sales outcomes or transactional 



outcomes – are delivered consistently to a high quality and to a rational, clearly established process is something that Hammerjack has been very successful at, with the aid of tools like Teams, Office 365, and Dynamics 365.

The rolling out of these Microsoft tools were an integral part of the company’s rapid growth in the past year. 

“At first, Hammerjack was focusing on a smaller number of clients. They were adopting the clients’ processes, bringing them offshore, but we didn’t have the technology background and the BPO background back then to make managed services really attractive for Australian SMEs,” Mault points out. 

“You could save up to 70 percent on a seat-leasing arrangement, however to see holistic benefit you would realistically need to pay for a large volume of seats and manage the resources yourself without offshoring experience from 6000 kilometers away, In most cases it’s a false economy with a high turnover rate,” explains Nick Hastings, who oversees business development back home in Australia.

“Or, you could save 50 percent, but then have the resource fully managed by us, with the experience, letting you focus on the things that drive your business,” he adds, pointing to the cost differences between managed services and doing it internally.

Hammerjack’s experience shows that SMEs are often much tougher customers than large enterprises – a thought echoed by the state-run Philippine Institute for Development Studies (PIDS) in a study it released. 

Because smaller businesses lack the resources and capacities of large companies, they are often much more averse to perceived risks in both digital transformation and offshoring, even if these offer significant cost savings over time.

“The key to a fully managed service is to use effective and efficient collaboration tools. Hammerjack uses the same digital solutions internally that we provide direct to Australian SMEs, enabling a quality outsourced service model for our clients at a lower cost,” Hastings said.

“After we came on board in July 2016, we accelerated what Hammerjack could do for SMEs across a wider range of services, and at more competitive transactional pricing. And that was done by embedding key processes in an approach to driving productivity and quality, and through adopting Microsoft technology,” he adds. 

“When the company started, they had an array of different applications, and it was really messy. The applications weren’t talking to one another, and they had an application for this and an application for that. Once, we switched everything over to Microsoft, we could collaborate more easily to put together proposals, while making our service delivery more efficient as well.”

The PIDS study also suggests that cost remains a big hurdle for many Australian SMEs, a fair conclusion considering that these businesses don’t have the economies of scale needed for traditional offshoring to work. Hammerjack solves this problem by offering a transactional model for offshore services, in contrast to more common seat-leasing and its co-managed resources.

 “The Microsoft stack helps us maintain a cross-functional team of skilled people, letting us queue work and offer transactional pricing to SMEs instead of a fully dedicated resource, which can be a bit concerning for small businesses.

If you give them an option to pay just for a transaction or an outcome, like better customer engagement or optimizing operations in one instance, then it becomes something smaller businesses are more willing to try. It’s low-cost and low-risk, and it lets them see if IT-enabled offshoring is something they’ll want to commit to more in the long-term,” Mault said speaking about the efficiencies borne by digital transformation are a prerequisite for this transactional offering:

 “It’s natural with the rate of change we’re seeing that if you’re not responsive, small businesses get nervous, this takes focus and capacity off their core business, so it’s very important to provide a proactive flow of information and hit the right answer quickly, that’s something that Microsoft is allowing us to do,” Hastings concludes as he says that start-ups need to be flexible, which makes a cost-effective transactional model more appealing.

“It’s also important to understand SMEs are constantly learning, so there’s a need to take them through a journey towards successfully leveraging digital, whether that be rolling out Dynamics 365 (CRM) into their business or taking some of their internal processes to the Philippines,” he adds.

“If you’re talking about digital transformation, and not pursuing that transformation yourself, then you’re probably not the right partner for start-ups. Dealing with new technology has given us credibility in the eyes of many small businesses.” he adds.
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