January 20, 2018, 4:54 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07263 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.14992 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03521 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37318 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02474 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03521 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03956 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63687 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03163 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00745 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.63172 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01978 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02627 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13568 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06382 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01978 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25445 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19324 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 395.96518 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03951 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02456 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01896 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.96895 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12736 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 56.62579 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.15506 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01978 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77275 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.40883 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.49743 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1197 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95886 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24462 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25141 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34978 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53817 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01607 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03956 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01433 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01431 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08957 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.9371 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.94699 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14509 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.07219 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15475 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46509 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11922 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25771 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.9644 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 263.35047 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06775 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.266 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.41772 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 723.08147 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02255 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.43928 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01399 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18216 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03224 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.37189 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.26622 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.12896 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.80063 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.02452 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00594 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01622 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.47765 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.7856 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.88528 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.04292 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.5093 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24248 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0603 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01227 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02646 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18183 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33356 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98418 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.46361 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.8837 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1593 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.96203 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64676 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30795 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.11195 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37086 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07803 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24161 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.0807 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6072 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15518 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0265 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02715 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0076 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01978 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06341 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0624 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18473 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06706 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 110.52215 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07202 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07488 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11739 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.52987 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07417 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15387 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26503 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13841 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15847 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02609 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01433 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4392 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 150.90981 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.85839 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 393.89636 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17306 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.18552 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24175 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.63054 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04769 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04409 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07507 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13281 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5839 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.34335 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56547 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.79588 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01978 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56468 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 160.81883 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19729 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 449.14952 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0449 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04966 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.5352 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0534 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.5352 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.90645 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.94363 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24183 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.64043 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.15783 Zimbabwe dollar

More PH companies are going to the Cloud. Here’s why.

MORE than 18 years ago, when Larry Ellison and Evan Goldberg founded NetSuite, there was this inescapable sense that the Internet would change everything. We have seen this happen in our lifetime, and
today we are at the forefront of the ultimate expression of the Internet’s disruptive nature: the cloud. Cloud-based solutions are revolutionizing a lot of things, not least of all the economy, as the adoption of
cloud computing continues to grow among Philippine businesses.

Majority of businesses that are open to adopting the cloud come from retail, wholesale distribution, services and non-profit. These have generally used new technologies to differentiate themselves in largely
competitive markets, or to optimize their operations, or support their growth. 

One perfect example is Explorer Freight, a Philippine-based company trucking and Customs brokerage service that has been in business for nearly 30 years. As NetSuite aids the organization in preparing for
next stage growth, it becomes evident that cloud computing can help a company achieve end-to-end workflow-driven efficiency across its core business processes, including financials, supply chain, customer
relationship management (CRM) and warehousing operations.

It also helps that the country has scored highly in freedom of information and protection of privacy—critical factors in cloud adoption. The latest report published by the Asia Cloud Computing Association,
shows that the Philippines has climbed up a slot to land in 9th place in the “Cloud Readiness Index,” effectively overtaking Thailand.

It doesn’t mean though, that cloud computing is only appropriate for specific industries. Basically any company, in any industry that seeks to differentiate itself and make the most use of its resources would be
impacted by cloud-based technologies. For small companies it allows them access the latest technologies with limited resources. For big companies, it allows them to be as agile as their smaller competitors
as markets change and become more competitive.

Here are six reasons why more Philippine companies are moving their business to the cloud:

Access the cloud anytime, anywhere. Cloud computing is “always on,” making it easy to grow your business and support remote workers and locations, or support a highly mobile sales or service team,
because people can access the cloud any time, day or night, from any browser, desktop or mobile device around the globe, 24x7. Imagine a Cebuano entrepreneur running his or her business while visiting
customers in Manila, vacationing in Bohol, or just lounging by the beach in Boracay.

Pay only for what you need. Customers pay as they go through a subscription-based pricing, often on an annual basis, unlike conventional systems where buyers have to make a major up-front investment in
licenses, hardware and software. In the Philippines, this is very important, where many companies are often capital constrained, and can benefit from better cash flow and far greater IT flexibility.

Save money on energy. By eliminating the need for on-premise hardware, cloud computing reduces overall server room electric consumption, which can save mid-size businesses substantial amounts more per
year, especially in a country like the Philippines where energy costs are relatively high.

High availability and security they can’t get from on-premise software. Cloud software architectures are designed from the ground up for maximum network performance, so they frequently deliver better
application-level availability than conventional, on-premise solutions. For example, NetSuite commits to 99.5% availability for its customers, and provides data security such as PCI DSS compliance that would
be cost prohibitive to achieve with on-premise software. Also, having cloud-based solutions gives Philippine companies peace of mind, as sometimes local offices and infrastructure are often more vulnerable
to weather disturbances and natural calamities like typhoons, floods and earthquakes.

Gets business up and running in a few short months. Customers can be up and running with ERP, CRM or ecommerce applications, on a local or global scale, within a few months, rather than the six to 12
months it would take to install and troubleshoot conventional servers and software. With the cloud, systems adjust to the company’s performance needs, dynamically assigning server cycles whenever and
wherever it is needed, and automatically adjusting to spikes in demand. For example: if the business experiences large swings in demand according the season or time of year, such as Christmas, the system
will adjust accordingly.

More time and energy focused on business. Cloud computing lets companies focus on their business rather than on their IT hardware and software. They don’t have to use valuable IT resources to keep
business systems on life support. Instead, they can re-deploy them to focus on more strategic business initiatives while leaving their cloud computing vendor to worry about scalability, security, uptime,
application maintenance and system upgrades.

This growing movement towards the cloud is seen not only in the Philippines but also across Southeast Asia, especially as companies in the region prepare for a more open and integrated environment for the
free flow of labor, capital, and trade under the ASEAN Economic Community. The need for real-time, relevant and reliable information is an absolute necessity to compete in this environment.

And this can only be done with cloud-based systems. By Jan Pabellon, Director, Product Management, NetSuite
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About noxious candles; man’s cunning

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Carpio’s terms for PH Rise research

By ELLEN TORDESILLAS | January 19, 2018
‘China should not be allowed to conduct marine scientific research in Philippine Rise which the United Nations Commission on the Law of the Sea has recognized as part of the Philippine extended continental shelf.’