November 24, 2017, 6:04 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07222 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.23697 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.035 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34334 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02609 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.035 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03933 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63992 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03265 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00741 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.27689 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01967 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02668 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13491 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06405 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01967 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28171 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20626 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 393.707 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03929 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0252 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01953 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.51721 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13055 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 59.27237 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.06096 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01967 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.84798 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42782 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.47748 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12472 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93215 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.25679 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26216 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34612 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53196 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01676 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0411 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01485 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01485 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.09043 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92566 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 176.89283 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14439 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.01731 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15359 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46264 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12608 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.21691 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.23442 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 266.33236 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06904 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28012 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.94985 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 692.86138 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03638 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.46903 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01391 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.2151 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03441 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.37082 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 78.99705 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.32547 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.69912 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.59685 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00593 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01613 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.50443 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.16618 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.60669 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.02262 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.44897 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2763 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05995 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0122 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02689 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18578 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34307 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.02635 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.80433 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.94494 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15822 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.90266 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6647 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30619 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.0885 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37348 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08155 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27622 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.00098 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60177 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16317 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03638 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02891 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00756 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01967 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06359 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06374 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06568 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07087 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 110.87513 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07473 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07785 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.16841 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.36755 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07374 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15449 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26735 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13097 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16686 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0267 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01486 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4367 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.85251 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.99312 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 410.64307 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17207 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.12743 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27624 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64562 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04905 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04547 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07723 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13037 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59133 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.93314 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51976 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.28811 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01967 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57699 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 158.89873 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19617 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 446.39136 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.10089 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05108 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.98368 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0531 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.988 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98682 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.91504 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2763 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.05507 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.11701 Zimbabwe dollar

ROAD SAFETY SERIES; Multiple PH road crash databases need integration, tuning

As the frequency of road crashes continue to increase, the government has yet to create an integrated database for drivers and pedestrians struck and killed by vehicles. Tuning and synchronizing these databases is the key to accurate reporting of road crashes in Metro Manila. 

Miguel Paala, World Bank consultant, said road crash databases in the country have questionable and incomplete data since most government agencies do not include important details in the report such as the names of the drivers or the passengers injured or killed in the road crash.

Paala cited in particular the databases of the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA), Philippine National Police, Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH), and the Department of Health (DOH).

He said road crashes are under-reported since these government agencies do not provide complete data and analysis.

Road crashes amount to 2.6 percent loss in Gross Domestic Product in the country.

In Metro Manila, there is an average of 262 crashes daily or 11 crashes per hour.

Data from the MMDA showed that the number of road crashes in Metro Manila has increased from 95,615 in 2015 to 109,322 last year.

In its Metro Manila Accident Recording and Analysis System (MMARAS) report last year, the MMDA said 426 of the 109,322 road crashes last year were fatal while 16,416 were non-fatal.

Most fatal accidents happened during January with 45 cases and December with 42 cases. It is important to note that these months have the most number of holidays, including Christmas Day and New Year’s Eve.

Majority of the fatal accidents were recorded in Quezon City with 116 cases followed by Manila with 66, and Caloocan with 36 cases.

The report also showed that 195 pedestrians died in a road crash last year, 194 drivers, and 57 passengers while 10,233 drivers were injured, 5,730 passengers, and 4,913 pedestrians.

The MMDA said 40,823 road crashes occurred during nighttime from 6 p.m. to 5:55 a.m. while 68,499 cases occurred during daytime from 6 a.m. to 5:55 p.m. While majority of the road crashes last year occurred during day time, most fatal accidents happened during night time and during wee hours.  

The MMDA’s Metrobase monitors traffic incidents in the metropolis using 300 high-definition closed-circuit television cameras (CCTV) installed in strategic areas. At present, the MMDA has only nine data researchers who gather data on road crashes.

MMDA personnel record road crashes in a logbook daily. They write the location, time, and plate numbers of the vehicles involved. Since the MMDA manually records road crash incidents, it takes time for the agency to analyze the data since Metrobase personnel need to encode each item on spreadsheets.  

Paala said the MMDA should directly encode road crash data into its database called the MMARAS since the blue books are vulnerable to loss.  

He said the DPWH discontinued recording data for its Traffic Accident Reporting and Analysis System (TARAS) in 2014 since data gathering was tedious. Meanwhile, the DOH’s Online National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (ONEISS) contains only details of injured persons and fatalities.

While the PNP has its E-Blotter System where it contains details about the victim, suspect, and narrative of the incident, the data is not open to the public and it does not include the cause of the crashes.

The Department of Transportation (DOTr) recently launched an online platform called the “Data for Road Incident Visualization Evaluation and Reporting” (DRIVER), which is a web-based and open-sourced database for geo-spatially recording and analyzing road crashes.

Transportation Assistant Secretary for Land Transport Mark De Leon said the agency opened the database to provide accurate and reliable information on road incidents. De Leon also said that with the Philippine Road Safety Action Plan 2011-2020, the agency is committed to reduce road crashes by 50 percent.  

The DRIVER website’s home page contains two maps indicating the severity of road crashes in the country. It also provides details on economic loss and the number of road crashes.

Data from DRIVER showed the government lost P1 billion for the past 90 days due to road crashes. Of the total P1 billion, the government spent P630 million for injured motorists and pedestrians and P55 million for casualties.

The database also recorded 2,506 road crash incidents for the past 90 days.    

DRIVER collects data from the MMDA, PNP, and local traffic units.

The online platform contains the date and time of the incident, exact location, weather, severity of the road crash (injured or dead), collision type (side swipe, bumped from behind, and multiple collision), and the main cause (vehicle defect, road defect, human error, and others).

While there are new databases on road crashes, the categories posted on the website are vague, particularly those under the “main cause” tab.

The “main cause” tab does not specify the cause of the crash. Human error does not indicate the action committed by the motorists such as speeding or driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

The same goes for the other categories such as vehicle defect and road defect. The website does not include the root cause of the road crash like wrong lane markings, blind corners, curves, equipment failure or brake failure.

The DOTr, DPWH, DOH, MMDA, Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), Department of Education (DoE), Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), and the Public Information Agency (PIA) are the institutions involved in road safety.

While the DOTr is the lead agency on road safety, Atty. Sophia San Luis, executive director of ImagineLaw, said the agency cannot compel local government units to enforce road safety laws since the DOTr’s mandate is limited.

These dilemmas show that data collection and analysis seem to be neglected in the context of road safety.

Two weeks ago, the DOTr held the Idea Hack contest for information-technology professionals, digital media experts, mobile app developers, and road safety advocates to create strategies that will help the government in improving data gathering on road crashes.

 According to the World Health Organization, road crash statistics are important for timely analysis of programs and for the development of road safety measures.

 Paala said government agencies should combine data to look for patterns related to road crashes and create programs or interventions to prevent tragedies.
 
This story was produced under the Bloomberg Initiative-Global Road Safety Media Fellowship implemented by the World Health Organization, Department of Transportation and Communications and VERA Files.
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