June 21, 2018, 9:14 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06897 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04526 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03404 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52113 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03343 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03756 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57728 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03184 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00709 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.88225 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02522 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12883 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07009 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.277 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19573 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 375.96244 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03752 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02494 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01868 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.01146 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12169 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.86948 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.59718 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78854 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41869 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33333 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12088 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93052 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20053 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25367 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33502 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51117 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01621 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03897 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01426 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01425 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08833 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87962 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.05164 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14052 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.88526 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14739 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44866 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1197 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23812 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.22103 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 261.46479 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06819 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27817 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.23474 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 796.99531 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05333 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4507 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01331 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06607 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89577 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28255 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.84601 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92488 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.90141 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.8492 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0154 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.40488 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.33333 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.26291 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.00282 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.66254 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2584 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05725 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01165 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02546 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17921 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31576 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99324 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.69014 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.33333 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15181 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.66667 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65765 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29239 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.39812 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3853 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07515 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25797 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.74178 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59151 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15379 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0385 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0272 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06164 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06142 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28545 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06993 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.70047 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06835 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07565 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1966 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.95174 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07042 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14841 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25277 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33719 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16718 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01426 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41701 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.29577 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57277 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 397.4216 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16432 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67099 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25817 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61446 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04845 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04326 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08905 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12487 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56648 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.59155 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49596 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.33803 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59211 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.69953 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1498.59155 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 429.12676 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02911 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04869 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62592 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0507 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62592 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92432 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69202 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25823 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.4554 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.79624 Zimbabwe dollar

SYMANTEC CYBERSEC EXPERT SAYS: An integrated cyberdefense creates enterprise independence

THE push for digital transformation (DX)—hinged on greater online collaboration, information sharing and resource swapping—has also seen organizations rapidly embracing Cloud solutions. Coupled with risky user behavior and many unknown variables in the online collaboration platform is also widening the scope for Cloud-based attacks.

Understanding the business needs to both decide to use and eventually enable online collaborative platforms is more important than the techonology itself. If an organization goes unprepared into online collaborations—from chat groups to simple emails—they may become vulnerable to cyberattacks without knowing it. 

“Many businesses these days see only the technology. How this technology can make the enterprise run better. Or adopting technology only from the point of view of productivity not seeing the issues of vulnerability. Sometimes things are happening that the organization may not even be aware of,” John Cunningham, VP for Cloud Security for the APJ, Symantec says in a one-on-one interview.

Just asking the simple questions, the CEO can challenge the Chief Information Officer (CIO) to think of the business also instead of just the technology. In many companies, according to Cunningham, the job of securing company from cyberthreats is usually left to the CIO or the IT department only. Conversely, IT departments fail to regularly include business units and executive staff when developing a Cloud strategy.

What are we doing in the Cloud? Why are my employees accessing the Cloud applications? Can anyone from outside make us vulnerable? Are the users truly authorized? Are they careful in transacting business with us? These are very basic questions, but the questions are usually not asked because the perspective of protection is the technology, not the business itself.

To understand this situation further John gives an example of how an email, sent via Office365, comes in to an employee via the normal channels. The employee then checks the email’s content, determines it is useful and since it has gone through the cyberdefenses of the company, it is not flagged and sent to a colleague for further processing. In that next step processing, the data now becomes open to attack because it is not know where it is stored, or where it goes, or how it is processed.

“This is where the problem lies, because without sufficient visibility it can be easy for a cybercriminal to penetrate the company. This may also happen because of careless employees or even rogue employees,” Cunningham explains as he points out that how the average enterprise is using 928 Cloud apps when most CIOs think only around 30 or 40 Cloud apps are used.

He shared how, based on Symantec studies that many enterprises aren’t aware of all of the Cloud services and data in use throughout the organization. And for organizations whose Cloud services are known, they cannot identify, classify, or granularly control access to, and manage the secure handling of sensitive, compliance-related data in apps they use.

“Now that is a business understanding. Not just technology but also policy, which again means understanding of the business,” the Symantec executive says adding that in the complex maze of collaboration the IT departments attempt to apply the same controls to all Cloud data. 

Oftentimes because of resources, enterprises overlook the critical need for threat detection, continuous monitoring, and post-incident response. In fact, based on their studies, most enterprises have no way to detect Cloud threats.

“If you combine that situation, with the fact that cybercriminals are opportunistic, and take advantage of flaws in legitimate operating systems, tools, and Cloud services to compromise networks, you will now understand why an integreated cyberdefense system is necessary,” Cunningham emphasizes.

Aside from the weak points in policy by a company, there is so much shadow data residing in the Cloud that further increases vulnerability. Symantec CloudSOC analysis found that 25 percent of all shadow data is “broadly shared,” increasing its risk of exposure. Three percent of this “broadly shared” data is compliance related.

Shadow data is business data stored in the Cloud without IT’s consent or knowledge simply because it was left there either by sharing or by storage, perhaps as a file uploaded into Google Drive or a stored document in Office365. 

A powerful cybersecurity platform should be able to align to both the organization’s business and security requirements. This means internal cooperation between the business and information technology elements in a company. Symantec suggests to create a Cloud Security Advisory Board. 

The question to ask is does my company need one? 

The answer is that is once a company does not have the policies in place for proper detection and protection, then it cannot operate independently from cyberattacks. It needs to know “what are the riskiest Cloud apps and services that are being used?” “What are the most critical data types in my organization?” And “who are my riskiest cloud users?”

If there is a need to know the answers, then a Cloud Security Advisory Board must be convened. To know further what solutions are right, consulting with a company like Symantec can deliver not only a technology solution, but a business plan that will mitigate more risks earlier because the risks can be identified from a business needs perspective.

“I am usually in the market 12 months before we deploy a project,” Cunningham says of his role in the strategy formulation in the region. 

“We come early here because we know that it is not just throwing a solution,” explaining how Symantec has everything from detection and mitigation of ransomware attacks, to improving security in accessing email accounts, providing flags to stop targeted phishing campaigns, and keeping systems immune to hosting malware.

Businesses are moving into the Cloud at a faster rate in the last 6 months than in the last two years. One study by the International Data Corp. (IDC) predicts there will be a 42 increase in DX investments, representing $1.7T worldwide by 2019. This also means more opportunities for cybercriminals to take advantage of.

Survival in DX will depend creating and using a powerful integrated cyberdefense platform to enable enterprises to fully embrace the technologies like the distributed Cloud, the Internet of Things, collaboration apps, which are also more vulnerable. 

Symantec aims to provide safer passage for companies to make the journey to DX faster.
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